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FAQs on Violet Gobies 2

Related Articles: There's a Dragon In My Tank! The bizarre and beautiful Dragon Goby By Jeni C. Tyrell,
Fresh to Brackish Gobioid Fishes

Related FAQs: Dragon/Violet Gobies 1, & FAQs on: Dragon/Violet Gobies Identification, Dragon/Violet Gobies Behavior, Dragon/Violet Gobies Compatibility, Dragon/Violet Gobies Selection, Dragon/Violet Gobies Systems, Dragon/Violet Gobies Feeding, Dragon/Violet Gobies Disease, Dragon/Violet Gobies Reproduction, & Brackish Water Fishes in General

Re: Dragon fish... Using WWM      10/9/14
Could u tell me what fish are good tankmates for the dragon fish?
<.... ? Read here:
http://wetwebmedia.com/BrackishSubWebIndex/VioletGobyCompF.htm
and the linked files above. Learn to use WWM. BobF>

Dragon Goby Stuck in Cave   /RMF     4/22/12
Hi, my name is Susan.  I have a BW tank for my dragon goby.  He is about 14" long and pretty thick. We also have hollow rocks that make great caves, especially when the dragon goby was smaller.  Well I was gathering up some mollies to move them to another tank and I think I spooked the dragon goby.
 When he didn't come out to eat, I searched the tank and found him squished inside a rock.  He is not coming out and feels pretty packed in there.  I can break the rock since its ceramic, but I don't want to hurt him in the process.
I also thought these fish might be air breathers and I'm thinking he is probably dead.  Is there a way to break the rock without hurting him? 
Should I break the rock?  Thank you very much for your time.  You guys have a great website and do a great service to the fish keeping community. 
Susan
<I would break this ceramic... just underwater... from the "head end" where the goby is stuck... with a metal tool... likely a wrench... Bob Fenner>
Dragon Goby Stuck in Cave   /Neale     4/22/12

Hi, my name is Susan.
<Hello, Susan!>
I have a BW tank for my dragon goby.  He is about 14" long and pretty thick. We also have hollow rocks that make great caves, especially when the dragon goby was smaller.  Well I was gathering up some mollies to move them to another tank and I think I spooked the dragon goby.  When he didn't come out to eat, I searched the tank and found him squished inside a rock.  He is not coming out and feels pretty packed in there.  I can break the rock since its ceramic, but I don't want to hurt him in the process.
<I can see that would be a risk.>
I also thought these fish might be air breathers and I'm thinking he is probably dead.
<Hmm… wouldn't bank on it just yet. These fish are normally quite resilient.>
Is there a way to break the rock without hurting him?
<Yes, assuming this is ceramic or lava rock rather than a tough rock like limestone. Put the object on a wet towel. Tap firmly with a hammer. Hopefully he'll slither out before the thing actually breaks, but ceramic is pretty brittle and should break with little harm to the enclosed fish. If actually rock, then things become riskier. I'd wait a 3-4 hours, but if he's still in there, I'd do as above, but carefully.>
Should I break the rock?  Thank you very much for your time.  You guys have a great website and do a great service to the fish keeping community. 
Susan
<Good luck, Neale.>
Re: Dragon Goby Stuck in Cave      4/22/12

<I would break this ceramic... just underwater... from the "head end" where the goby is stuck... with a metal tool... likely a wrench... Bob Fenner>
<<Ah, you see I thought to break the ceramic outside of the water… easier to be careful and less concussive force transmitted through air than water, so less shock to the fish. On the other hand, in the water will provide cushioning against damage, to some degree at least, lacking in air. Six of one, half dozen of the other… Neale.>>
<I just hope this fish will be okay. B>
Re: Dragon Goby Stuck in Cave    5/6/12

I greatly appreciate you both for your help. Sadly it was too late for my favorite fish. Again thank you for your quick response.
Susan
<Thank you for this follow-up. Will share w/ Neale. BobF> 

Violet (Dragon?) Goby Questions   2/26/11
Hello there!
<Jill>
Recently, I lost my Dragon Goby of four years (How long I had him as a guest).
My setup was an 'L' shaped tank, usually 76-77 degrees Fahrenheit, specific gravity of somewhere like 1.008 usually (though sometimes it dipped down to 1.005 in the summertime, because the heat of outside kept my tank at 75 and when I had the heater on it leapt up to 80 or even 90...).
<Yikes!>
I tried to keep it ammonia free, and tested my water bimonthly (ever two weeks). I had a 30 gallon sump from Trigger Systems
<Unfamiliar>
that seemed to work very well. According to my test kit the alkalinity, pH, nitrate, nitrite, and hardness were in the optimal range for brackish water, and from what I've seen online its standards were pretty widely accepted. The substrate was 1-2 inches of marine sand over an inch of coral sand, and there were a few cheapy plastic plants, a fake mangrove root, some tunnels, and a little 'castle' type thing. I don't know how many gallons were in the tank, but it was 60" long for the long part of the L, 40" long for the short part, a consistent 20" wide, and 18" high. I kept the water line at like 16".
<There are about 231 cubic inches in a gallon... Multiply the L times W times H... divide by 231>
I guess basically what I'm going about asking is how I could avoid losing my next dragon goby, and what I may have done wrong. When he died, he had been seeming sick for two weeks, I noticed he stopped eating about a week beforehand and seemed lethargic two weeks beforehand. I thought he might have a fungus because I noticed a little bit of tearing at the ends of his pectoral fins and he seemed a little slimy, so I changed the water and when it persisted another two days treated with Maracyn. He ate his regular bloodworms,
<I would leave these out... implicated in troubles nowadays>
and had a few of his blackworms, but didn't eat any of the algae wafer (He usually went for that first).
<Really?>
Then he stopped eating anything except the bloodworms, and then he wouldn't eat those. I fed him a few blackworms and bloodworms and half an algae wafer every other day. When I came home 15 days after this all started, he was lying on the bottom of the tank, breathing a little bit but not very often, and he was very, very thin. He was like 15-16 inches long, and initially had gotten pretty fat too, but he was so thin. He died after about an hour. He had three bumblebee gobies as tankmates, which I'd been told would do well in the same temperature range and SG, and they're in an isolation tank right now but they seem okay. I continued the Maracyn treatment with them just in case. I'm wondering what else I should do for them, where my mistake may have been, etc. Also, I just wanted to thank you for your wonderful site! I first got interested in tropical fish after transitioning my goldfish into pond life (they grow so much better there!)
<Ah yes>
and having a bunch of empty tanks laying around. Before I got Mofish I did a lot of reading and your FAQ and article proved to be the most helpful quick reference I could find, and until recently it helped me keep him and his tankmates healthy. I'm not sure where I went wrong, and would love some insight to prevent this in the future. Thanks so much for your time!
<I would have you read t/here again:
http://wetwebmedia.com/ca/volume_3/cav3i3/Dragon_Gobies/DragonGobiesart.htm
BobF>
Violet (Dragon?) Goby Questions (Bob, ideas?)<<I just sent my resp. to you...>>   2/26/11
Hello there!
<Hello Jill,>
Recently, I lost my Dragon Goby of four years (How long I had him as a guest).
<Was likely less than a year old when purchased, assuming that he wasn't full size. Most of them seem to be about half-grown when sold, maybe 30 cm/12 inches long at most, often smaller.>
My setup was an 'L' shaped tank, usually 76-77 degrees Fahrenheit, specific gravity of somewhere like 1.008 usually (though sometimes it dipped down to 1.005 in the summertime, because the heat of outside kept my tank at 75 and when I had the heater on it leapt up to 80 or even 90'¦).
<Ah, now, this is one factor. Violet Gobies are more subtropical than tropical. They're typical Gulf Coast fishes, and appreciate slightly lower temperatures than tropical fish. Something around 18-24 C/64-75 F would be about right. A little cooler or a little warmer for short periods would do no harm, but prolonged maintenance at higher temperatures will shorten their lifespan noticeably. That's a common enough phenomenon, and can be seen with other fish from similar latitudes: (wild-caught) Mollies, Platies, Goodeids, Hogchoker Soles, Florida Flagfish, etc.>
I tried to keep it ammonia free, and tested my water bimonthly (ever two weeks). I had a 30 gallon sump from Trigger Systems that seemed to work very well. According to my test kit the alkalinity, pH, nitrate, nitrite, and hardness were in the optimal range for brackish water, and from what I've seen online its standards were pretty widely accepted.
<Cool.>
The substrate was 1-2 inches of marine sand over an inch of coral sand, and there were a few cheapy plastic plants, a fake mangrove root, some tunnels, and a little 'castle' type thing. I don't know how many gallons were in the tank, but it was 60" long for the long part of the L, 40" long for the short part, a consistent 20" wide, and 18" high. I kept the water line at like 16". I guess basically what I'm going about asking is how I could avoid losing my next dragon goby, and what I may have done wrong.
<For one thing, keep a little cooler than you are doing at the moment.>
When he died, he had been seeming sick for two weeks, I noticed he stopped eating about a week beforehand and seemed lethargic two weeks beforehand. I thought he might have a fungus because I noticed a little bit of tearing at the ends of his pectoral fins and he seemed a little slimy, so I changed the water and when it persisted another two days treated with Maracyn.
<I see. Now, one thing to try with brackish water fish is to raise the salinity substantially, and if you can, perform seawater dips for 20 min.s or more. These will clear up slime disease and certain other parasites, and with much less toxicity than medications.>
He ate his regular bloodworms, and had a few of his blackworms, but didn't eat any of the algae wafer (He usually went for that first).
<Indeed, a favourite food.>
Then he stopped eating anything except the bloodworms, and then he wouldn't eat those. I fed him a few blackworms and bloodworms and half an algae wafer every other day. When I came home 15 days after this all started, he was lying on the bottom of the tank, breathing a little bit but not very often, and he was very, very thin.
<Not a good sign.>
He was like 15-16 inches long, and initially had gotten pretty fat too, but he was so thin. He died after about an hour. He had three bumblebee gobies as tankmates, which I'd been told would do well in the same temperature range and SG, and they're in an isolation tank right now but they seem okay.
<They are quite hardy fish, if feeding well.>
I continued the Maracyn treatment with them just in case. I'm wondering what else I should do for them, where my mistake may have been, etc. Also, I just wanted to thank you for your wonderful site! I first got interested in tropical fish after transitioning my goldfish into pond life (they grow so much better there!) and having a bunch of empty tanks laying around. Before I got Mofish I did a lot of reading and your FAQ and article proved to be the most helpful quick reference I could find, and until recently it helped me keep him and his tankmates healthy. I'm not sure where I went wrong, and would love some insight to prevent this in the future. Thanks so much for your time!
<There are a few things that spring to mind. One is simple life expiry. When kept overly warm, these gobies won't live as long as otherwise. In addition, gobies generally don't have very long lifespans, and while 10 years is often mentioned as being possible with Violet Gobies, that's probably a best-case scenario, with something like 7-8 years being more likely. So if your specimen was already a year or so old when you got it, and you kept it a little on the warm side at times, it might well have been 5-6 years old when it died, but already into old age and all the problems that brings with it. Now, one other thing I'll mention with gobies is that they do seem prone to odd infections. I've had three completely different goby species in one tank and then watched as members of all three species sickened and died within a short period; the other, dissimilar fish in the tank -- catfish and so on -- didn't have any problems at all. Symptoms included bloody patches on the body, loss of appetite, wasting, lethargy, and then death. While I can't be sure, my hunch is that one of the gobies brought in some sort of infection that the other gobies caught. It may be that healthy gobies can fight off the infection, but older specimens, or stressed specimens, can't, and then they become ill and die. One last thing to consider with oddball fish is nutrition. Because they don't always eat flake, you're often stuck with using fresh or frozen foods, and these can be nutritionally incomplete. In particular, insufficient vitamins and/or overdosing Thiaminase can cause problems that may take months or years to manifest themselves. The use of a marine aquarium vitamin supplement therefore makes a lot of sense when feeding carnivorous and oddball fish. Hope this helps, Neale.>
Re: Violet (Dragon?) Goby Questions (Bob, ideas?)   2/27/11

Wow! Thank you so much for the fast reply.
<No problem.>
I went to my LFS just now and there were several vitamin options, which I wanted to run by you guys if it wouldn't be too much trouble.
<Any will do.>
I didn't want to trust the store clerk because they were the people who sold me my violet goby and when I bought him they had been keeping him and several others in a freshwater tank, so I wasn't sure they had the right stuff. So my options are something called Vitamarin-M, which looks promising by its high price *sarcasm* and was recommended,
<It's a fine product.>
but doesn't really list its ingredients or sources on the bottle. The second is Vita-Chem, which promises a full spectrum of vitamins, amino acids, and microorganisms but is not specific to marine fish (it says it's specific to 'fish),
<Another good product.>
and then there's one called Vitality, which promises the same benefits as vita-chem and is formulated for marine fish.
<From Seachem, and yet another good product.>
I was wondering if you had any personal experience with any of these and could recommend which is best. I have found mixed online reviews of all of them, except for the Vitamarin for which there were mostly positive reviews.
<They're all good, and all better than no vitamins at all. Do read here:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/vitaminmarfaqs.htm
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/ca/volume_6/volume_6_1/thiaminase.htm
It's thiamin in particular that may be the "missing link" in understanding fish diets.>
In addition, Mofish was 8 and 7/16 inches when I got him. The pet store decided to measure him and charge me an extra 10 cents for every inch longer he was than all the other gobies, who were all labeled and priced as being 'small' (they looked about 3 inches or so). I guess he was a baby, though, even though he was very large compared to the others. Now that you mention the illness your goby specimens experienced, it sounds very much like what happened to Mofish, as the gill and fin hemorrhaging I saw the day he died I attributed to the other fish attacking him because he was sickly, but it may have been more like open sores now that I think about it.
<Indeed. The problem of course is that many nutritional problems result in open sores, so it's really hard to say for sure.>
I'm glad you mentioned the temperature as well, I'm going to be lowering it for the little gobies in small increments and waiting another week before I reintroduce them to their bigger tank. When I'm ready, I'll probably get another dragon goby too, thanks to your awesome advice! Again, thank you SO MUCH.
<Glad to help. Cheers, Neale.> 

Dragon Goby Questions 1/13/11
Firstly, I would like to thank you for the time and effort you put into answering these letters as thoroughly as you do.
<Welcome Kim>
On another frequent visit to my local fish store I saw what looked like a snake
or an eel in a tank with some Pleco's. The name on the tank stated that it was a Dragon fish/ Dragon Goby/ Violet Goby. I asked my favorite clerk who knows a good bit about the fish they frequently stock. He said that they could survive in fresh water
<Not for long, well>
but thrived and preferred Brackish water. He said they can reach 20 inches long!
<Yes>
I asked if they were predatory and he said that he wasn't sure because he hadn't had the time to really research them yet as they were new arrivals but that he felt sorry that they couldn't provide it with a brackish display tank to live in while it was there. I said since it gets to be 20 inches long what size tank should it be in?
<Mmm, let's skip ahead here and have you read:
http://wetwebmedia.com/ca/volume_3/cav3i3/Dragon_Gobies/DragonGobiesart.htm
and the linked files re this species at the bottom tray>
He responded with... well if you really want to give it room to swim something twice the full length of the fish would be good. So I came up with a 40 inch tank in my head. I resisted the urge to have him scoop one of these predatory looking giants into a bag and let me take him home in favor of thoroughly researching the new captor of my heart.
I then went home and did some research. I found a brackish book online and found it at my local library. But to my surprise it had nothing in it about this dragon I'd seen and there were no other books on brackish water fish in detail.
So I came home and started to Googled it. I found a LOT of conflicting information. Some sites claimed that this fish could live in freshwater as they're found in fresh water as well as brackish water while others claimed that they would NOT do well in freshwater. I found a rather shady looking forum that had a man on there that claimed to be a fish shop owner that had "impulse bought" one of these giants and said that "through experimentation" and the many experiences of his clients that he'd come to "realize" that these fish are highly adaptable and can live in practically any water conditions. I was slightly appalled...
<I as well>
sure they can adapt but they shouldn't have to! But he seemed to latch onto anyone claiming that they had one in a freshwater tank and it was okay and used that as "undeniable proof" that they're adaptable. The forum was so heated over the issue that a moderator had to come onto the forum and state "Keep it friendly or this thread will be locked it's being watched very closely".
There was also a lot of debate about the size of tank to use with these guys but Liveaquaria and several other sites say that 50 gallon minimum. Which is great because I have a fifty gallon aquarium that I've converted to a brackish water aquarium.
The one thing that no one ever really mentions is tank mates. Some people (those who ignorantly and defiantly believe that they can keep it alive and healthy in a freshwater aquarium) stat that they "wouldn't hurt a neon". I then began to research possible brackish water fish and creatures and came up with a pretty slim selection of fish. Monos, scats, mudskippers, fiddler crabs, archers, and a wide array of puffer fish. I then went onto Yahoo! Answers and posted the following question: "Dragon Goby tank mates?" and got only two answers that lacked that certain... truthfulness I desire. One said that he had 20 years
of experience with aquariums and stated that he had a Dragon goby in a 30 gallon tank with some neon tetra's and guppies and that it was brackish.
<Mmm, doubtful. Neons don't "like" salts>
I then said that I did not want to mix fresh and brackish fish because of the different water requirements to which he vehemently and quite defensively added that "he'd had his Neons alive for 2 years in that tank". and the other answer claimed that they weren't brackish water that they were marine and showed me two different
marine fish including a Firefish and some other marine goby that "proved" this.
They weren't even the same fish for crying out loud!
So here are my definite questions
1. What specific gravity do they need? (I found on your site that they like 1.005 to 1.010)
<Yes>
2. What tank mates can I have with him?
<Posted... see Compatibility FAQs...>
3. I found some archer fish at my LFS that I like a lot. Would these be a possibility and if so would they thrive in 1.005-1.010 salinity and a 50 gallon tank? How many could I "reasonably" fit in there if any.
<Depends on the species of Toxotid... see here:
http://wetwebmedia.com/BrackishSubWebIndex/Archerfishes.htm
My equipment consists of:
1. one 50 gallon tank with the measurements 48 long, 19high, 13wide
2. several small/medium sized rocks
3. PH neutral sand
<Mmm, you may want to switch this out or add some calcareous media in time>
4. One 45 gallon HOB filter and one internal 30 gallon filter
5. One appropriate sized heater that reliably heats to the temperature I set it at.
6. Hydrometer
7. Internal floating glass thermometer
Any suggestions on decorations that will be practical as well as aesthetically pleasing would be much appreciated. It's not only my passion but my joy to provide fish with the proper care in order to see them at their greatest.
<Outstanding>
The tank has been running for 4-5 weeks now and is fully cycled. I will be adding oceanic salt to it soon and monitoring the levels. I just don't know what fish I'll put in there to make sure the bacteria stays alive. I have a Green spotted puffer but they're sensitive and I hate putting them in an unstable tank.
Any suggestions on that since my grandmother won't allow me to keep pure ammonia in the house?
<A bit of flake food daily will do...>
Thank you for tanking time to read this have a blessed day.
<And you Kim. Bob Fenner>
Re: Dragon Goby Questions 1/13/11

Okay sorry if I'm bugging you I just like to be exceptionally thorough when researching.
<Good>
I explored the links you gave me and have a couple more questions for the time being.
Sand: You said something more calcareous in nature. This is to keep the pH high yes? The water here most often reads between 8.0-8.2.
<Yes and good range for this species>
Archer fish: They were specifically Toxotes jaculatrix I wrote it down... I always carry a notebook with me to my favorite LFS because they're always getting new fish species in.
<Dang! You're an ideal aquarist~!>
(It's part of the reason I currently have 8 tanks up and running 1 ten gallon shrimp tank, 2 ten gallon Halfmoon Betta tanks (one male per tank and nothing else except some stupid pond snails I can't get rid of), one ten gallon Fiddler crab tank (brackish at 1.005), One thirty gallon Green spotted Puffer tank (brackish at 1.012), One cycling Fifty gallon tank using Seachem's Stability and 6 Zebra Danios that will be a Multifasciatus Dwarf cichlid tank, and one brackish 50 gallon tank with nothing in it yet)
Would those specific archers go well? If so how many?
<T. jaculatrix is fine, and if they can be purchased small/ish (1-1.5" overall), three would be a good number... placed all at once if possible>
Thanks for your patience, Kim
<Glad to share w/ you. BobF>
Re: Dragon Goby Questions, fdg... rdg.  1/13/11
I just thought of something else that seems to be debated. I read on this website that they won't particularly eat pellets or flakes but prefer frozen/ live foods. I feed my puffer beef heart, frozen blood worms, and brine shrimp (frozen and alive when I can get mine to hatch). Would these foods work? I also have shrinking shrimp pellets and bottom feeder pellets as well as Spirulina wafers Hikari brand always if I can find it.
<... I referred you to these links:
http://wetwebmedia.com/BrackishSubWebIndex/VioletGobyFdgF.htm
I'm sure I'll have questions on the archers when I can get home from work to research them. There's an archer section that goes in depth on them from this website?
<... see our last email. B>

advice... Whacko rant/jokester... re    6/14/10
I've had my violet gobies for years.
<Nice fish.>
The big ones about 10 inches.
<A fair size, though can/will get to about twice that size eventually.>
I got them from a buddy who started to breed them awhile ago, because they're hard to find, and he gets a good price for them.
<Seriously? He breeds Gobioides broussonnetii? Never, ever heard of anyone do this. Without photos of the eggs and fry, I'm sorry, I have to assume you're either [a] pulling my leg; or [b] breeding another fish entirely.>
I think my big one is getting ready to spawn and my buddy is not around right now so I thought I would give you guy's a try.
<Apropos to what?>
But I see what a bunch a geeks you are with this saltwater crap.
<Meaning what? These are brackish water fish. Go look it up on Fishbase.>
He got his from a freshwater tank, and all are doing great-on flake food.
<No-one said they don't eat flake. It just isn't what they need, and mostly they ignore it. If your specimen eats flake, that's great. But mostly they don't, and if you many visit aquarium shops, you'll see a LOT of very skinny specimens on their way to death by starvation.>
You soulless XXXXards are obviously just pushing sales.
<Sales of what? We don't get paid by salt manufacturers, trust me. And I'm a pretty vocal critic of the use of salt when it isn't required.>
Keep living for that almighty dollar and Karma will get you!
<There's lots of bad karma chasing people who keep their fish in the wrong conditions and end up killing them. If your specimen is fine in freshwater, then you got lucky. Most Violet Gobies do badly kept that way, believe me.
I've been doing this a very long time. Cheers, Neale.><<Time for your pills big boy. RMF>>

Dragon/Violet Goby, sys., fdg. gen.  -- 01/13/2010
Hello,
<Hello Melanie,>
I have a 38 gallon tank that is 36"x15"x17" and have it stocked with one 1 Goby, 1 Rainbow Shark (yes I know it's actually a minnow), 3 Sunburst Platies (2 female, 1 male), 1 Rosy Barb, 1 Black Skirt Tetra and an unknown amount of ghost shrimp (there were 7, have only found up to 5 at any one time).
<Shrimps don't always do well in community tanks, if for no other reason than they get damaged while moulting.>
I added 1 tsp aquarium salt per every 2 gallons of water and it looks like from reading I do need to increase it
<Yes.>
and possibly switch to marine salt
<Yes; I'd start at about 9 grammes marine salt mix per litre of water (1.2 oz per US gallon), for a specific gravity of SG 1.005 at 25 degrees C (77 F). This will be just about sufficient for long-term success with Gobioides, and acceptable for a variety of other fish too, including Platies, Mollies and Guppies, should you want to add them. The shrimps might do okay. But the Minnows, Barbs and Tetras would have to be re-homed.>
and get a hydrometer, the poor goby was in fresh water at the LFS.
<Oh!>
Draco, the goby was quite thin and fairly inactive at the store.
<Likely, though usually a question of starvation rather than water chemistry. Gobioides can tolerate freshwater for months, but they are finicky feeders in some ways, and easily starve in busy community tanks.>
That is no longer the case it has gotten very fat off a diet of algae wafers, shrimp pellets and thawed frozen blood worms (2-3 times a week), so fat I'm a bit concerned it's belly may burst.
<Then don't feed so much! Honestly, a healthy fish should have a gentle rounded abdomen rather than a beer belly.>
Other than that it seems healthy in that it moves around the tank a lot and seems to nearly always be looking for food. I always drop the food in the same place under a fake root thing he/she and the Rainbow Shark like to hide out in, that way he knows where his food is. The shark actually keeps the other fish from getting at the worms but doesn't chase the goby away so that is good.
<Hmm...>
I don't have a sand substrate but it is a very small gravel size that's nice and rounded. I plan on getting sand, marine salt and a hydrometer next month since my paydays are monthly.
<Cool. Plain smooth silica sand from a garden centre will be cheap and 100% aquarium safe. Avoid anything "sharp" as this'll do more harm than good. If you want, you can stir in some coral sand as well, to raise the carbonate hardness.>
Oh and I've had Draco for about 10 days now he is about 5-6" long and there are no extra bits of food on the substrate the fish eat all that's given and want more but both Draco and Red (the shark) are much plumper and a bit longer than when we brought them home (they were bought at the same time and both eat the same foods).
Any information you can give me about my goby's fat belly would be greatly appreciated. My only guess is that Draco is not a he but a she and perhaps it's eggs that have it so bloated.
<It's quite possible you're overfeeding. This is simple enough to check.
Don't feed for a few days, and see what happens. If the fish become thinner, there's your answer. Would consider that before worrying about anything more serious.>
Thank you
Melanie
<Sounds to me as if you have the situation well in hand. Good luck! Cheers, Neale.>
re: Dragon/Violet Goby -- 01/13/2010
Thank you for your swift reply. I did plan not to feed him for a few days but feel a bit bad about that so just gave him far less of the shrimp pellets, though yeah I know in nature food supply is not always so plentiful so I'll try that.
<Cool.>
As far as water hardness we have hard water here as is fairly usual in CA, but just the same I did add a piece of coral to the water since coral sand & Aragonite is good in order to buffer the water and increase hardness, therefore a piece of coral should help with that.
<Indeed. Marine salt mix will dramatically improve things, to the degree you won't have to worry about water chemistry at all.>
Draco has dug himself a little pit area under and behind the aquarium heater,
<Heater guard installed, I hope. Otherwise a boiled goby is on the cards here...>
silly boy (yes I do know it's in his nature but it's still cute.
<Cheers, Neale.>

Learning to speak Violet Dragon Goby   3/9/09 Greetings! I've been reading on your site and others about dragon gobies having recently acquired two. They started out in my 80 gallon community tank and seemed very happy living with the rest of the community. Digging their own tunnels under the decorations, burying themselves from time to time into the sandy sections created for them. The community consists of : 2 Opaline gouramis 2 peacock eels 2 adult black lyre tail mollies 2 adult silver mollies 4 pot belly mollies 25 silver molly fry 1 plecostomus 1 African feather fin cat fish 12 red Platys One of the gobies seems to be more reclusive than the other hiding in caves most of the time, rarely seen even at feeding time unless the decorations are disturbed and the other, active and visible especially at feeding time. Diet consists of Algae tablets, brine shrimp, Spirulina brine shrimp and blood worms with occasional sprinkles of flake food. I noticed that the recluse had developed a film of what appeared to be a fine coating of sand or tiny air bubbles all over his body. At first I thought it was ICK and treated the tank accordingly for 7 days...treat, wait 48 hrs, water change and treat again, wait another 48 hrs water change wait 24 hrs and treat again. At the end of the treatment there was no change so I asked the local fish store and determined it might be Velvet and treated for that. After 48 hours we finally got them into their own 65 gallon brackish home with a salinity at the low end of brackish .001 since moving them into their brackish home, they have both taken to floating vertically taking large gulps of air and blowing it out through their gills swimming horizontally from time to time but spending most of their time in that vertical position. What I think was velvet seems to have reduced in size but they don't seem to be doing as well in the brackish tank as they were in the fresh water tank... Any recommendations or thoughts would be appreciated. I looked on line but couldn't find anyone with similar issues. Thanks in advance Wizard <Greetings. I'm not familiar with this particular problem, and certainly haven't seen Gobioides spp. do this. Velvet and Ick could both be treated simply by maintaining these gobies in the brackish water system. Raising the temperature to around 28-30 C (82-86 F) will speed up the life cycle, and that will shift the parasites from the host into the water column, where the salinity should kill them. Personally, I'd raise the salinity up to 1.003 at least; this won't stress your filter bacteria, but will help the gobies. Do otherwise take care that water quality is appropriate. Don't feed the fish for the time being, but after a couple of days, if they've settled down, offer some live food and see if they behave normally. One last thing. Gobioides spp. are territorial, and the one you aren't seeing much of is clearly the one bullied by the dominant fish. Take care to put hiding places at each end of the tank, so they can at least space themselves out. Cheers, Neale.>

Violet gobies, moving, sys.  9/23/08 Hi Neale, <Shawna,> I'm moving in a couple of days and need to know how to transport my 2 gobies. It's a 10 hour trip. I also have 2 zebra Danios and 2 Plecos to transport. I don't have much room in the front of the moving truck so I am limited to things I can do. Do you have any suggestions? I don't want my fish to die on the way up there. Thanks, Shawna <Go buy two or three big buckets with lids: something of the order of 5 gallons. I got mine for a shop where they sell paint, for painting walls and stuff. I think professionals use these buckets are used to store large quantities of paint. Anyway, half-fill with water, put a sensible number of fish in each of them (e.g., two the gobies and the Danios in one, the two Plecs in the other). Put the lids on. Bundle the buckets up with towels, heavy overcoats, or most anything that will keep them insulated. They will be happy like that all day long. Every few hours you might decide to lift the lid to let some fresh air get in, but otherwise leave the fish be. Remember, when transporting fish the key things are to stop them getting chilled and to keep them supplied with oxygen. Beyond that, they're quite easy to transport, otherwise the whole tropical fish exporting business wouldn't be viable! Hope this helps, Neale.>



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