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FAQs on Anemone Disease Diagnosis 1

FAQs on Anemone Disease: Anemone Disease 1, Anemone Disease 2, Anemone Disease 3, Anemone Disease 4, Anemone Disease 5, Anemone Disease 6, Anemone Disease 7, Anemone Health 8, Anemone Health 9, Anemone Disease 10, Anemone Disease 11, Anemone Disease 12, Anemone Disease , &
FAQs on Anemone Disease by Category: Environmental (Pollution/Poisoning, Lighting...), Nutritional, Social (Allelopathy), Trauma, Pathogenic (Infectious, Parasitic, Viral) Predatory/Pest, Treatments 
FAQs on Anemone Disease by Genus, Species: Condylactis Disease, Sebae Disease, LTA Disease, Magnificent Anemone Disease, BTA Disease, Carpet Anemone Disease, TWA Anemone Disease, Sebae Disease,

Related Articles: Anemones, Bubble Tip AnemonesLTAs, Cnidarians, Coldwater Anemones, Colored/Dyed Anemones

Related FAQs: Cnidarian Disease, Anemones, Anemones 2, LTAs, Caribbean Anemones, Condylactis, Aiptasia Anemones, Anemones and Clownfishes, Anemone Reproduction, Anemone Identification, Anemone Compatibility, Anemone Behavior, Anemone Selection, Anemone Placement, Anemone FeedingAnemone SystemsAnemone Lighting

... how do you know if the anemone is dead? <Anemones will turn into a pile of mush and deteriorate very quickly when they die.>

New Print and eBook on Amazon:  

Anemone Success
Doing what it takes to keep Anemones healthy long-term

by Robert (Bob) Fenner

question regarding bubble tip anemone         7/28/16
Hello,
<Maria>
I am writing in order to see if I could get some guidance/help regarding mi bubble tip anemone.
I currently have a Boyu TL550, 130 lt, saltwater aquarium.
I placed my E. quadricolor 3.5 months ago, and for the first 2 months she did great (I am attaching a picture from when she looked healthy).
Since 3-4 weeks ago, the anemone has progressively lost her ''bubbliness'', and the tentacles have ''shriveled'' and look flaccid and ''thin''. The colour has also changed; from a bright orange, to a darker orange-brown and some sectors even look greenish. 1-2 weeks ago the anemone decided to close (similar as when lights are off), and has decided to stay like this for days. Today, she opened, but after 2 days of being closed. I have two
Ocellaris clownfish, the female resided in the anemone, the male resided in an Euphyllia.
<Aye ya... here's some trouble>

Now they have both moved to the Euphyllia, however the female goes back to the anemone any time she exposes her tentacles.
I have never fed the anemone, except for 2 weeks ago (she was already looking shady) with a mix of brine shrimp and saltwater and squirted it; there was no change.
<Needs to be fed two, three times a week>

I have checked my parameters, temp is 24-25 C, pH 7.9-8.1, density 1.021-1.023
<S/b 1.025-6>

(they are pretty steady). I recently got more parameters, and the only parameter that was not right was nitrate (20 ppm). Nitrite, ammonia, phosphate, calcium, dKH were ok.
<? Meaningless w/o actual data, numbers>
The rest of the aquarium looks fine (other residents are Rhodactis, Kenya tree, Parazoanthus gracilis, 2 Ocellaris, Sixline wrasse yellow watchman  goby, Salarias fasciatus, 3 hermit crabs, 3 snails, 1 Lysmata amboinensis).
If you could guide me in this issue I would be most appreciative.
<Well; as stated above; the Euphyllia is winning here, the Entacmaea losing (allopathically); this animal is starved, and the environment? Did you review BTA Health on WWM? All this is gone over and over... As are suggestions for improving the situation... moving the Caryophylliid or Actinarian (they need to be in sep. systems); foods/feeding... and
improving the animal's world. Bob Fenner>
Thank you very much!

Is my anemone dying?? New Anemone in an Inappropriate Environment -- 6/17/08 Hello, <Hello Danica, Brenda here! > Two months ago I bought a 10 gallon fish tank, with a bio-filter (100gal/hour). I filled it up with salt water and tested the salinity and it was determined to be at the right level. I also bought an ammonia and nitrate test kit, after a month the levels were finally down to zero and I decided to put fish in. I went to the LFS and bought a small clown fish a live rock and an anemone. <Your system is much too small and is not mature enough to support an anemone. > I put it all inside the tank and everything seemed to be going good. The clown was in the anemone; the anemone was hanging onto the rock and was big and inflated. The next day I wake up to find the anemone completely curled up with a brown ring around the base and I can't seem to see the mouth anymore. The brown ring has since fallen off (?) or is no longer there. <Slime> I've looked around to try and find pictures like my anemone and I can't find any that are completely curled in like mine. I've included a picture of what it looks like. I don't know if it is dying, disturbed, unhealthy or what. Also if the anemone is dying, will the clown fish be ok without an anemone for a week until I can buy another? <Please don't buy another anemone. Your clownfish will be fine without it. Your anemone is closed up because it is unhappy. It is not going to be happy in its current environment. I'm assuming you don't have the appropriate lighting for this creature. It is time to return the anemone to the place you purchased it. Before purchasing another please research their requirements. Read through all the anemone FAQs found here: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/marine/inverts/cnidaria/anthozoa/anemones.htm  > Thanks,
Danica

Dismal. RMF

H. malu changing colors, possibly dyed. -- 4/28/07 Hello! <Hi Nicole, Brenda here> I purchased a H. malu anemone about 3 weeks ago and I'm still trying to figure out whether it is healthy or not. I believe it is, but upon doing research, I've come across somewhat conflicting info. I hope you can help me sort this out. <I will try.> Color:  My anemone currently has a pinky-peach column with magenta splotches and a yellowish tinge toward the top.  It also has magenta stripes radiating from its mouth and magenta rings around its pinky-peach tentacles.  That sounds OK, however, the very tip of its tentacles are white and there are about 5 inner tentacles with the bottom half stark white and the top half pinky-peach.  Also, some of the outer tentacles have a yellowish tinge to them.  Does this sound normal or is it recovering from a bleaching? <I would really need to see a picture.  The different color is making me believe you may have a dyed anemone.  There is more information on dyed anemones here:  http://www.wetwebmedia.com/dyedanemfaqs.htm > Waste or Zooxanthellae: I've come across info regarding the gunk that anemones expel.  I've seen the nasty, crusty looking white stuff coming from its mouth as well as a transparent sack.  I also noticed a couple days ago long dark brown stringy stuff coming from its mouth.  Again, I've read that the brown stuff is waste but I've also read that it is the anemone losing its zooxanthellae.  Which is it? <I have seen anemones expel waste that is white, black and brown.  If your anemone is losing color and turning white, it is losing its zooxanthellae.> Feeding:  Because I was concerned by its coloration (white and yellow areas) and felt it was a recovering bleached anemone, I read that it is important to feed it every 2-3 days until it is healthy again. (I've been feeding it silversides and scallops. Sometimes I soak the food in  Zoe).  I also read that healthy anemones can be fed from 2-3 times per week to once a month.  What is the appropriate feeding frequency for a healthy H. Malu. (BTW, mine is still small with a column about 1.5 - 2 inches in diameter. <I recommend feeding 2 to 3 times per week.> Is it correct to determine its size by the diameter of its column or the spread of its tentacles? <I have always measured by the spread of the tentacles.  However, I am not sure that is correct.> Will an anemone always take food that's offered or will it refuse if it is not hungry? <A healthy anemone should always grab onto the food.  However it may not eat it if it is not hungry.  It may also eat it and regurgitate it later.> Location:  When I first put the anemone in my tank, it buried its column into the sand and then it realized it wasn't happy and walked for a second and tipped over and leaned on a rock. <That doesn't sound good.> During a water change, the current floated it toward a cave and it eventually placed itself between the rocks and that's where it has been for about 2 weeks, though its column is not buried in the substrate.  I was happy because I read that an unhappy anemone wanders around the tank and a happy one stays put. <Some anemones are just too sick to wander.> But then I read that happy and healthy anemones like to be in the light and are on rocks or buried in the substrate in the current to catch food.  And unhappy/ unhealthy anemones put themselves between rocks and hide from the light.  Well, which one is it?  Is my guy happy but shy or sick and sensitive to light? <It sounds like you have a sick anemone.> Last question(s): It turned green!  Recently I noticed that its tentacles were turning green, were shriveled up and its column scrunched down. <It is not uncommon for an anemone to become darker in color when it shrivels up.  This is typically when the anemone is expelling waste.> I changed the water thinking it was giving me a clear sign that the water was getting too dirty and it did open up a little bit immediately after the water change.  But after a little while it shriveled up again, still green. The only thing I could think to do was to turn off the power head assuming it was the current irritating it. Well, sure enough, it opened up again after I turned off the power head. Its tentacles retained the greenish color for a little while and then went back to being pinky-peach. <I have not heard of this.  I don't recommend the use of power heads with anemones.  Many anemones have lost their lives to them.> The thing is, I hadn't changed the position or strength of the current so why did it suddenly begin to bother the anemone? And why/how on earth did it turn green? <I don't know.  I would love to see pictures of this.> I look forward to your responses and suggestions.  BTW, great website! <Thank you!> Nicole
<Brenda> 

Anemone In Distress? Hi <Hi there! Scott F. here today> Have recently purchased a Condylactis anemone. Brought it home, and it was doing well for about a week.  Now his tentacles seem to shrivel up.  Why does it do this?  It seems to do this to all areas of itself so I am not sure if something is wrong or not. I took a sample of my water to a fish store and everything checked out.  Please help.  Thanks <Well, there are many factors that affect anemone health. Water chemistry parameters are just part of the equation. Look into nutrition, etc. as well. Lighting is another very important factor, perhaps the single most important factor. Light intensity, specifically. Re-asses your environmental parameters, and adjust as needed. We have lots of good information here on the WWM site! Good luck! Regards, Scott F>

Grr.. Sick BTA <Did these anemones feed regularly in the first month?> However for the past 5 days or so one of them has never inflated beyond half way, and the tentacles have remained all straggly.  It will open a bit more at night, but the tentacles never inflate.  It will not accept food, either.  The second BTA is doing great, eating, growing, etc. <Many possibilities here... not the least of which (no worries) is if it came form a tank with much lower light. Its not an issue of light shock, per se... but under aged lamps, weaker lamps, dirty/dusty lights and canopies/lenses... anemones and corals will swell up and pan for light (giving the appearance of being healthy ironically). Then when they get into better light, they do not need to pan so severely. It is that simple at times.> I did find a small Aiptasia anemone (the bastards) near the BTA.  I'm not sure if it was close enough to have stung it or not, but the possibility is definitely there.  If it was stung, would it be behaving like this? <Nope... they are much tougher than that.> Any way to get it eating and healthy again if so? <Try feeding small amounts of meaty "juice" to the tank at the same time every night. You can condition a feeding response in just a week or two this way. Do it at the end of the day or after the lights go out for zooplankton feeders like this.> My water quality is excellent as of yesterday (0 ammonia, nitrites, less than 5 ppm nitrates, pH 8.3, temp 80F, SG 1.025). <You may want to double check the accuracy of your hydrometer. If this is a plastic job (or handheld refractometer... crap), then I definitely would consider keeping at least one other meter (glass hydrometers are excellent... sparing the need for tabletop refractometers) for periodic calibration.> Lighting is a 150w metal halide and 2 55w PCs (10,000k and actinic).  Water changes are performed at least twice weekly of about 4 gallons <Hmmm... great that you're doing twice weekly water changes but the amount is rather modest/tiny... this will not adequately dilute the undesirables. It would be better to do much larger exchanges.> Also in the tank is a yellow headed jawfish, ~2" maroon clown, a few xenia bunches, a few patches of green star polyps, a Ricordea (partially shadowed by the LR), and a few gorgonians. <Likely not the issue, but star polyp and gorgonians are very noxious... two of the worst (re: allelopathy) > Anyone have any ideas?  The BTA still has a firm grip on the rock it came on, hasn't move more than an inch, but it's looked half dead for about 5 days now.  It's stressing ME out. <Be patient my friend... and above all - DO NOT move this anemone. A surefire way to kill it :( > Anthony

Anemone Health This could be quite possibly the stupidest question anyone has ever asked... <I highly doubt it.  We are all friends around here, in fact I need to ask bob if I can stuff my wetsuit to make me look more masculine, now that is a stupid question.> My boyfriend and I have a 55g tank we recently purchased a 'beaded anemone' we were told that it needed more light and we bought a new light fixture it is 2-65w pc.  my question is how do you know if the anemone is dead? <Anemones will turn into a pile of mush and deteriorate very quickly when they die.> It has been on its side for 2 days now and today there is something that looks like a huge tentacle hanging out of its mouth ( it is pretty disgusting looking)  We are reluctant to take it out of the tank in hopes of reviving it, and we don't want to kill it if this is a possibility, however we are also worried about the health of the other fish in the tank.  your help in this matter would be greatly appreciated.  -Jessica <Test your water quality frequently and run extra carbon in your filters.  Anemones are very popular at the local fish stores, but not the easiest to take care of, they do best in well established tanks (years old).  How are its colors looking?  Bright white usually indicates it is bleached from stressed and does not have the necessary zooxanthellae to photosynthesize.  If it is in decent enough shape you might try feeding it.  Pristine water quality is key for the anemone and the health of the other inhabitants.  Throw on a pot of coffee and start reading here http://wetwebmedia.com/marine/inverts/cnidaria/anthozoa/anemones.htm  and the related links for more information and similar experiences.  Best of luck, Gage>

Closed Anemone... I recently purchased a sebae anemone at a local pet store.  The aquarist told me that it was normal for the anemone to sometimes close up.    <Yes, but not for extended periods..> I brought it home - it opened up but has not stretched out in the 5 days I've had it.  My clown fish are not responding to it at all. <Not uncommon- many are tank raised and have never associated with an anemone before!> It has attached itself to the live rock but is just not expanding.  I have tried to stimulate it with food but I can't tell if its really eating or not.  It changes it's shape but it's not expanding.  What can I do to stimulate it so that it opens up and stretches out like my Condylactis anemone does? <Well, there are no guarantees here. Anemones require (almost categorically) intense light, brisk circulation, and outstanding water quality. Also, the presence of the other anemone in the tank is not a positive here. Potentially chemical interactions between the two are possible. You did not outline anything about your tank conditions, so I can only recommend that you check all basic parameters (ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH, alkalinity, specific gravity) and see if there are any that need tweaking. Do read up on the WWM site about anemones and their care...They are rather touchy animals with exacting requirements, so make sure that your tank has the appropriate conditions. If these are met, hopefully your anemone will open up and settle in. Good luck! Regards, Scott F>

Re: Anemone problem Thanks so much for the reply. I truly hate it when something dies in my care.  <agreed my friend> I don't feel I did a good job in researching an LTA before purchase. That said, I would still like to save this animal. <it happens... we can correct it though> The LTA is at the bottom of my 90G AGA (24" down). I tried to move him up onto the rocks last night, but he returned to the same location on the sand.  <unfortunate... there are many reasons for this too (sensation of another cnidarian, path of water flow, etc).> I was feeding him whole pieces of krill; 1/2" - 1" long so perhaps you are right about him starving. I will try the < 1/4" pieces tonight if he'll hang in there.  <yes... shredded meats of marine origin. Regurgitation is obvious if you know what to look for. A floating ball of mucous waste usually. Some other creatures scavenge it in the night though oftentimes> I've got three questions: Can an LTA survive with my lighting setup if fed nutritious food stuff?  <extra feeding would buy you time, but not replace weak lighting in the long run. Alas... most anemones need full reef aquarium lighting and most don't get it. I'd suggest that you set up a smaller tank just for the anemone by a South or East facing window with natural sunlight. Then you won't have to spend a lot on an expensive lighting system> Could my Condy be affecting his health at all?  <absolutely... in fact, almost certainly. Stinging animals sense each other and constantly conduct silent chemical warfare> Is there a trick to get him to stay on the rocks, higher in the column? What's the cheapest way to add MH lighting? (4th question snuck in:) A retrofit 175 watt MH with a 10K Aqualine bulb or a 6500K Iwasaki bulb would work nicely. Do consult DIY sites across the web for lighting support like at www.ozreef.org (follow DIY link)> Your help in saving this animal is GREATLY appreciated. I'm not very happy with myself on this purchase. Living and learning is OK, but no sense in making the LTA pay for it. <you will be fine my friend. Thank you for caring. We have options here rest assured. Anthony>

Long Tentacle Anemone Assistance My name is Mac Lewis, and just for the record I'm female *s*. <Hi, there...Mac. My name is Anthony and just for the record, I'm a Sagittarius (insert swanky disco music here). But seriously... beyond the wise cracks, my pleasure to be in your service> I've been out of the hobby for a couple of years but have recently returned and I've got a question about the strange behavior of a long tentacled anemone. <welcome back... I shall do my best> The tank he is in is a 75 gallon.  It has actinic lights, triton lights and sun spectrum lights on it.  I'm running a Magnum 330 with a quicksand filter on it, and a Fluval that is of similar size.  I plan on adding a protein skimmer in the near future <as soon as possible...critical, in my opinion for most> and a wet dry eventually. <may not be necessary if your fish load is light and you invest in enough live rock (a better filter choice for small/medium fish)> My base is a mixture of sand, and crushed shell. <hmmm... how thick? Course is a detritus trap...long-term problems if greater than 1/2 inch depth> I've had this long tentacled a couple of weeks.  When I bought it at the pet store it was lovely and thriving nicely.  I brought it home and brought the two Tomato clowns that had claimed it as well.  They all settled in nicely. The long tentacled kept his size well etc.  The pet store had tried to feed him a dead damsel fish <horrible idea...way too large food. Could even cause harm (rare)> but he rejected it when he got to my tank. <not surprised> The next day, after putting him in my tank I was amazed to see, 6 domino damsels and the two clowns playing in this anemone.  It was packed with fish. And the two clowns were playing in and out of his mouth. <fantastic...the beauty of the sea! How fortunate you are.> In recent days, while the base color remains Orange, he appears to have shrunken down.  At the top of the orange I'm seeing white which I don't recall seeing before.  His tentacles appear plump and okay, not withering. What worries me is that his mouth appears to be gaping open. <indeed often a bad sign> Upon testing the water it appears to be in great shape. <what is your pH, temperature, alkalinity and nitrate specifically?> The damsels are not in the anemone anymore, only the tomato clowns.  He moved in adjustment to a power head which made a current of water that I added because I was concerned with top water circulation and exchange. I was concerned about what he was eating and last night hand fed him a chunk of brine which he appears to have digested okay but there is just something not right about him. <fine but never feed anything larger than brine, and stop that food altogether. it is nutritively barren. Try fine zooplankton or Mysis shrimp> He feels sticking to the touch but he just appears to be drooping.  He has attached back to another spot so perhaps I'm worrying over nothing but I was told that a gaping mouth is a sign he's in decline and I'm going to lose him. <not necessarily> Could you tell me whether he's okay? What you think I might be doing wrong? How I could assist him? <please report back with your water chemistry readings...do a water change (always when in doubt do a proper/gentle water change). Beyond that... your lights will not keep this animal alive in the long run. Although the spectral mix you have is good... standard output fluorescents are fairly useless beyond eight inches of water depth for intensely symbiotic animals like anemones and coral. unless your anemone is right at the surface of the water, it is suffering from a net daily carbon deficit (not enough photosynthetic activity to produce enough carbon for basic survival). Feeding fine (easy to digest) nutritious foods will help, but the animal needs more light intensity. Consider a shallower tank or a brighter set of lights. A pair of VHO's (two 110 watt each) would do the trick or a comparable power compact light outfit. This hardware is a bit dear, so be sure you want to commit to the anemone or find a new home if necessary. Best regards, Anthony>
Anemone Follow-up
Thanks for your replying so quickly Anthony *s*.  let me try to clarify and give you some more details so maybe you can help. <Hi, Mac...quite welcome and ready for round two. Anthony> The tank he is in is a 75 gallon.  It has actinic lights, triton lights and sun spectrum lights on it.  I'm running a Magnum 330 with a quicksand filter on it, and a Fluval that is of similar size.  I plan on adding a protein skimmer in the near future  <as soon as possible...critical, in my opinion for most> The plan is to get the Protein skimmer this weekend <<be sure to focus on fine tuning it to produce a cup of product daily...tedious at first, but low maintenance after the initial learning curve. Seek further advice if you do not get a cup a day... there is no such thing as a "clean" fish tank that cannot yield that much skimmate>> and a wet dry eventually. <may not be necessary if your fish load is light and you invest in enough live rock (a better filter choice for small/medium fish)> I do plan to add some live rock and in the meantime added some live aragonite last night. <<excellent. Live rock and sand are very good investments in your tank's health>> My base is a mixture of sand, and crushed shell. <hmmm... how thick? Course is a detritus trap...long-term problems if greater than 1/2 inch depth> Nooooooo its only about 1/2 inch. <<too cool...you are quite on track>> I've had this long tentacled a couple of weeks.  When I bought it at the pet store it was lovely and thriving nicely.  I brought it home and brought the two Tomato clowns that had claimed it as well.  They all settled in nicely. The long tentacled kept his size well etc.  The pet store had tried to feed him a dead damsel fish <horrible idea...way too large food. Could even cause harm (rare)> but he rejected it when he got to my tank. <not surprised>  The next day, after putting him in my tank I was amazed to see, 6 domino damsels and the two clowns playing in this anemone.  It was packed with fish. And the two clowns were playing in and out of his mouth. <fantastic...the beauty of the sea! How fortunate you are.> Yes I know and I'm determined to keep this guy happy. In recent days, while the base color remains Orange, he appears to have shrunken down.  At the top of the orange I?m seeing white, which I don't recall seeing before.  His tentacles appear plump and okay, not withering. What worries me is that his mouth appears to be gaping open. Although the Clowns really keep staying in his mouth, and his mouth is very large.  He does still have all of his Zooplankton color. <indeed often a bad sign> Upon testing the water it appears to be in great shape. <what is your pH, temperature, alkalinity and nitrate specifically?> I don't have the specifics here with me at work but the ph I remember was 8.1 the temperature is 78 I didn't test for Alkalinity and the nitrates were not showing on the test kit.  Ammonia was not showing in the test kit either. <<pH is definitely too low and perhaps a part of the problem. Ph is highest during the day and if 8.1 is the best we can do, then there is a problem. 8.3 (night-time0 to 8.6 (daytime) is a well buffered tank. Average seawater is 8.45. You'll want to discover alkalinity to interpret why your pH is low>> The damsels are not in the anemone anymore, only the tomato clowns. He moved in adjustment to a power head which made a current of water that I added because I was concerned with top water circulation and exchange. I was concerned about what he was eating and last night hand fed him a chunk of brine which he appears to have digested okay but there is just something not right about him. <fine but never feed anything larger than brine, and stop that food altogether? it is nutritively barren. Try fine zooplankton or Mysis shrimp> Okay ordered some Zooplankton today, good foods are really in short supply around here. He feels sticking to the touch but he just appears to be drooping.  He has attached back to another spot so perhaps I?m worrying over nothing but I was told that a gapping mouth is a sign he's in decline and I?m going to loose him. <not necessarily> I did the water change last night( 15% ) and added the live aragonite.  When I did the changed he flipped over but quickly righted himself.  No signs of disintegration and his color still looks good.  His mouth is not gapping nearly as big today and I'm looking into the halogen lights.  And you are right they are definitely dear. <<a shame, but a necessary evil>> Could you tell me whether he's okay? What you think I might be doing wrong? How I could assist him? <please report back with your water chemistry readings...do a water change (always when in doubt do a proper/gentle water change). Beyond that... your lights will not keep this animal alive in the long run. Although the spectral mix you have is good... standard output fluorescents are fairly useless beyond eight inches of water depth for intensely symbiotic animals like anemones and coral. unless your anemone is right at the surface of the water, it is suffering from a net daily carbon deficit (not enough photosynthetic activity to produce enough carbon for basic survival).> Until I get the lights I could find ways to raise him, with rocks or even a shelf if necessary. <<very good in the meantime>> <Feeding fine (easy to digest) nutritious foods will help, but the animal needs more light intensity. Consider a shallower tank or a brighter set of lights. A pair of VHO's (two 110 watt each) would do the trick or a comparable power compact light outfit. This hardware is a bit dear, so be sure you want to commit to the anemone or find a new home if necessary. Best regards, Anthony> Thanks so much for your help again, Mac Lewis <you are very welcome... best of luck to you, Anthony>> 

Question on Sebae Anenomes I have a long tentacle sebae anemone who has suddenly become ill and has reduced in size and color turned from pink to gray. The sebae does this periodically but has recently become ill or is in the process of dieing. What is the life expectancy of her? Candace Ringle <The color change of this anemone (Heteractis crispa) is a very bad sign... I would quickly look to find what sorts of chemical and/or physical poisoning that may have led to this condition... and correct it/ or if possible, move the specimen to another going system. Many possibilities exist that would account for the sudden change/loss of this animal... most likely "something" in your water... likely from an additive/supplement... possibly a negative interaction with other livestock (frequently other stinging-celled life like Mushrooms...). In any/all cases, I would execute a large (50%)water change and install a "unit" of activated carbon in your filter flow path... Do this NOW. Bob Fenner, who also urges you to keep a close eye on the anemone and remove it (a large siphon works best) if it is obviously dead.>

!@#!%$! carpet anemones Dear Bob, I have read the archives and know you are plagued with anemone questions so please forgive me but I just have to ask... I have a 180 gal reef lit with three 250 watt 6500K lamps. The tank is close to seven years old and the only filter is an older six foot Marine Tech 3500 counter current skimmer. The substrate is live sand and crushed coral over a plenum forming a total depth of 3 inches. I have many Acro's, monti's, and several other genus of scleractinian corals that thrive and grow like weeds. I even have a sebae anemone ( Heteractis crispa) that I bought probably five years ago that has grown from no more than three inches in diameter to a huge 14-16" monster. This animal is the one that plexes me; why does it thrive in my aquarium but carpets DIE!!!!! <Hmm, another of those/these "great mysteries of life"... likely a "founder effect" at play here... The existing anemone is outcompeting/poisoning/stinging the new comers... Or maybe some of your other stinging-celled life is contributing... Or perhaps the other anemones (carpets) are just bunk specimens that wouldn't have lived... they come in terribly in general... torn, doomed... Or, maybe the conditions in your system in some way are simply unfavorable to them.> I recently received a beautiful blue carpet, it is my third blue carpet and like the two prior it is Stichodactyla gigantea. It came in rough and even had aconite/mesenterial filament coming through the middle of the foot.  <Bingo> I know this one is unlikely to live but it expands so nicely it makes me wonder why they die.  <It's more an artifact of our "subjectivity" here... our frame of experience generally entails warm-blooded animals... they live, and die quickly... should "things" go wrong... Such is not the case with much of the invertebrate and coldwater vertebrate world... they can be "insulted" and seem fine... for days, even weeks... only to succumb to those challenges later... with little or nothing to reverse the possibility> It like the two before it is located on the bottom in good flow and bright light. It is constantly undulating and its mouth is still open to about the size of a quarter. This is exactly what the other two did before they shrunk up and melted, one lived almost a month and appeared flawless when I received it, the other had a similar foot problem and kicked it in about a week. I know, I know, carpets even anemones in general, suck, but WHY????? I don't know if you have any suggestions, any would be appreciated. I can find little to no info other than the basics; from Sprung, Fautin, Nielsen, on carpets and so I thought I'd write down my frustrations and send them to you. Maybe if we all do this we can find a common theme, other than death, that will lead to husbandry success. Oh yes I can't end with out the standard tank parameter b.s. : ammonia 0.0mg/L nitrite 0.0mg/L nitrate 10-25 mg/L phosphate 0.0mg/L pH 8.0-8.3 calcium 400 mg/L KH 12 One last question, could my old sebae be battling the carpet chemically and do rival clowns, in this case ocellaris vs. polymnus have anything to do with the loss of carpet life? I am dreadfully sorry for the length of my letter, but let it be known, your suffering through it is most appreciated. Thanks again, ] Todd <Ah, you and I at least share some of the same possibilities and sensibilities... Do read over the wealth of info. on these animals husbandry stored on the Breeder's Registry, and send Stanley Brown there your observations to help others. Bob Fenner, who would place any further specimens in a separate quarantine system under bright illumination for a couple of weeks... utilize a bunch of activated carbon in your main system, right ahead of moving the new carpet(s) to it...>

Dead/Dying Anemones? I just bought a sebae anemone, and was wondering what happens to it when it dies <Hmm, well, this species, Heteractis crispa, does die way too often... generally from trials and tribulations of extraction (collecting, shipping, handling...), and secondarily from being placed under unlivable circumstances (inadequate lighting and filtration principally)... But if I understand your question... what happens? They turn to mush, dissolve and pollute the system they're in... sometimes taking other livestock with them... Best to assure the animal is alive (turgid, open, attached...) and if not (flaccid, shriveled, loose...) to remove it... if need be via a large-diameter siphon... to prevent more of its remains mal-affecting your system/other life. Bob Fenner>

My bubble tip anemone I just got my bubble tip anemone 2 days ago. It seemed healthy, it  immediately attached to the live rock and expanded. Well today it is  shriveled and a few strings of brown mucus looking stuff is sort of stringing  out of it. Is it zooxanthellae? Is it as good dead or do the release this  "stuff" from time to time? Everything else in my tank is doing great. My  pulsing xenia is looking the best I've ever seen it. The water quality is  great. Should I get ride of this time bomb or give the anemone a chance? Jared  >> Yikes... if you have another place (another tank set-up, even a quarantine...), I would move the animal... it doesn't sound good... not healthy... for whatever reason(s)... and could become a problem if it died/dissolved quickly (which they do)...  The stringy stuff hanging out is not zooxanthellae but part of the anemone's defensive mechanisms... and not a good sign either... Something... too much/too little chemical, circulation, light-wise... or chemical incompatibilities with other life in your system is likely "to blame"... Solution(s)? Find the missing/abundant cause and cure it... or move the animal where the cause(s) might/might not be... at least where if the animal does die, it will not cause other harm. Bob Fenner

 

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