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We ask that, before submitting a query, you refer to Neale Monk's: Before You Write; A Checklist of Common Problems with Freshwater Aquaria, Bettas, Goldfish, and Freshwater Turtles (Terrapins), Tips on Asking Questions, Ask the WWM Crew a Question, FAQs on FAQs. EDFP, TBPFWFAQs, Last Few Days Accrued FAQs, Subscribe to the Daily Pics

Astronotus ocellatus (Agassiz 1831), the Oscar. To seventeen inches (45.7 cm). South America: Rio Amazonas basin in Peru, Colombia, Brazil, Northern Paraguay and French Guiana. Freshwater: pH range: 6.0 - 8.0; dH range: 5.0 - 19.0, temp. 22 - 25°C. Wild type at  the Shedd Aq. 2015 
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Freshwater FAQs, Ask us a question: Crew@WetWebMedia.com

Updated 10/21/2018
Other Specialized Daily FAQs Blogs: General, Planted Tanks, Ponds, Brackish, Last Few Days Accrued FAQs,
Daily Q&A replies/input from the WWM crew: Darrel Barton,
Neale Monks, Marco Lichtenberger, Bob Fenner, are posted here. Moved about, re-organized daily Current Crew Bios., Not so current Crew Bios
____________________________________________________________

New Print and eBook on Amazon

Betta Success
Doing what it takes to keep Bettas healthy long-term

by Robert (Bob) Fenner

Note: BobF is out visiting in Washington, D.C.; hence the dailies will be delayed.

Female white molly lost activeness      10/21/18
I'm watching her for 3 to 4 days she lost her activeness. Then I think she is pregnant but here you can see a pic one green spot reflecting from her body.
<... Mollies are perennially (always) pregnant to degrees... What re your water quality? This fish/species needs hard, alkaline water, a modicum of salt... no ammonia or nitrite. I would not be especially, directly
concerned re this green spot. DO read on WWM:
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/fwsubwebindex/mollies.htm
and the linked files above. Bob Fenner>
Re: Female white molly lost activeness      10/21/18

Please help me out to make my white molly more healthy.
<Read on! BobF>

Question Regarding African Clawed Frogs     10/18/18
Hi there, I was wondering if there are any sorts of diseases/bacteria/etc. that are transmissible from ACFs to humans.
<As with any aquatic pet, the most common transferrable diseases are Salmonella-type food poisonings. Not from the animal itself, but from decomposing organic matter around the aquarium. Touch the tank, touch your mouth, and boom, the bacteria can get inside you. Of course most people are fine and never experience a problem, it's a good habit to treat an aquarium as you'd treat raw meat, and after handling, wash your hands accordingly.>
About a week and a half ago, I ended up having some frog water splash into my eye, not a huge amount, but enough that I decided to rinse the eye out with eye wash once I had finished with the water change. Around 4 days ago my eye started becoming very bloodshot and hasn't cleared up so far. Maybe I just hit my eye in my sleep and didn't notice or something but just in case, it'd be nice to know if there's anything in particular to keep an eye on. Thanks.
<Unlikely to be anything serious, but if bacteria-laded water or organic material gets in the eye, it can trigger conjunctivitis. No different to when you get soil in your eye, or anything else not completely clean. Best to consult your GP or an optician, who'll likely suggest the use of some sort of antibacterial eye drop. Cheers, Neale.>

Undecided about how to treat further     10/18/18
Hi crew!
I originally added 7 peppered Corydoras to a filtered and cycled quarantine tank. They have been in there for almost two weeks (I plan on quarantining for 4 weeks).
I purchased them from a local chain fish store. They told me that they had been treated with Quick Cure for about a day while in display tank.
<Mmm; the ingredients are too harsh (formalin, Malachite Green) for Corydoras, most catfishes>
My tank parameters are 0 ppm ammonia and nitrite, 5 ppm nitrate, pH 6.8, temp 76°F, Aquaclear filter and airstone, sand substrate, driftwood and wood stone.
<Sounds good>
I lost two corys the second day after I added them to my quarantine tank. I did carefully acclimate them and they didn't seem stressed afterwards. I don't normally add medication to the tank unless I notice a problem. The second morning one of the corys had severe pop eye in both eyes. Eyes were not cloudy but were severely swollen, one eye had actually ruptured.
<?! What happened here? Something/s very wrong... too much difference twixt the waters? The fish too long in the bag, overheated...? Some source of overt poisoning? I'd removed the driftwood, add activated carbon to your filtration>
A second Cory had mild pop eye in both eyes and a third was on its side breathing rapidly (no pop eye). The Cory with the severe pop eye died that morning as did the one on its side with respiratory issues. I did a small 15% water change (parameters were normal) and dosed the tank with Kanaplex. I did a full three dose course of Kanaplex, then 48 hours after the last dose did another water change (25%) and have basically just been observing for further symptoms. The Cory with the mild case of pop eye recovered completely and up until today everyone has been eating and acting normal. I did have one that was away from the group quite a bit and not as active but still coming out to eat.
This evening when I got home, one of my corys (I believe the less robust Cory) was basically floating near the surface; still alive, he will swim a bit when nudged, but not looking well. No sign of hemorrhage under skin, body normal with good slime coat, fins and barbels normal, respiration normal but extremely lethargic and just floating at surface. Upon inspection he looks perfectly normal. The remaining 4 corys are eating and acting normal.
I do have Metroplex on hand as well as General Cure. Do you think I should try adding Metroplex to the water column or food?
<I would not. Metronidazole has specific uses. Unless you/I can detect the organisms involved (if any; which considering the rapid onset...) I would not treat>
I do a water change every 5 days (tomorrow is 5th day) but even though I match pH and hardness and temp, I'm afraid a water change will push the sick Cory over the edge. Although the antibiotic appeared to resolve the original problem, I don't want to repeatedly dose the tank. I'm wondering if there could be an underlying parasitic problem (gill fluke?). None of the corys look emaciated and even the sickly one has a normally rounded belly. Any suggestions?
Thanks crew!
Sue
<Corydoras paleatus is a hugely aquacultured species of long use; quite labile in its placement, range of conditions. Again, I suspect either trauma or toxicity at fault here. Would just remove the driftwood, add carbon... Bob Fenner>Undecided about how to treat further     /Neale     10/21/18
Hi crew!
I originally added 7 peppered Corydoras to a filtered and cycled quarantine tank. They have been in there for almost two weeks (I plan on quarantining for 4 weeks).
I purchased them from a local chain fish store. They told me that they had been treated with Quick Cure for about a day while in display tank.
My tank parameters are 0 ppm ammonia and nitrite, 5 ppm nitrate, pH 6.8, temp 76°F, Aquaclear filter and airstone, sand substrate, driftwood and wood stone.
I lost two Corys the second day after I added them to my quarantine tank. I did carefully acclimate them and they didn't seem stressed afterwards. I don't normally add medication to the tank unless I notice a problem. The second morning one of the Corys had severe pop eye in both eyes. Eyes were not cloudy but were severely swollen, one eye had actually ruptured. A second Cory had mild pop eye in both eyes and a third was on its side breathing rapidly (no pop eye). The Cory with the severe pop eye died that morning as did the one on its side with respiratory issues. I did a small 15% water change (parameters were normal) and dosed the tank with Kanaplex. I did a full three dose course of Kanaplex, then 48 hours after the last dose did another water change (25%) and have basically just been observing for further symptoms. The Cory with the mild case of pop eye recovered completely and up until today everyone has been eating and acting normal. I did have one that was away from the group quite a bit and not as active but still coming out to eat.
This evening when I got home, one of my Corys (I believe the less robust Cory) was basically floating near the surface; still alive, he will swim a bit when nudged, but not looking well. No sign of hemorrhage under skin, body normal with good slime coat, fins and barbels normal, respiration normal but extremely lethargic and just floating at surface. Upon inspection he looks perfectly normal. The remaining 4 Corys are eating and acting normal.
I do have Metroplex on hand as well as General Cure. Do you think I should try adding Metroplex to the water column or food? I do a water change every 5 days (tomorrow is 5th day) but even though I match pH and hardness and temp, I'm afraid a water change will push the sick Cory over the edge. Although the antibiotic appeared to resolve the original problem, I don't want to repeatedly dose the tank. I'm wondering if there could be an underlying parasitic problem (gill fluke?). None of the Corys look emaciated and even the sickly one has a normally rounded belly. Any suggestions?
Thanks crew!
Sue
<Hello Sue. One possibility is your Corydoras have been struck by something called 'Red Blotch Disease', likely similar to your standard issue Aeromonas and Pseudomonas infections that cause Finrot. It seems to be related to the stress caused by shortcomings in the environment, so rather than catchy per se, it's something several catfish might exhibit because they've all been stressed. When Red Blotch Disease was first described, it was usually associated with imported catfish that had been shipped in less that perfect conditions or held in overstocked tanks. Today you're most likely to see farmed or tank-bred Corydoras, but it's still possible for catfish to be kept in ways that cause them stress. Now, while the problem is bacterial, if the underlying triggering factors in the environment aren't fixed, antibiotics won't help. So while something like Tetracycline or Minocycline should help, let's recap the fundamentals. Almost all Corydoras prefer cooler water with plenty of oxygen -- exceptions including Corydoras sterbai and the Brochis species -- but certainly your common species like Bronze, Peppered, Panda, and Leopard Corydoras will all be best kept between 22-25 C/72-77 F. Another key thing is that the substrate should be both clean and soft. What I mean here is that the surface should be regularly siphoned to remove organic muck, with the top 1 cm or so being stirred beforehand to remove anything buried inside it. The substrate should be soft sand, smooth silica sand being ideal. Sharp sand and coarse gravel abrade catfish as they try to dig, making Red Blotch Disease more probable. One sign the substrate is 'wrong' is to look at the whiskers -- if they're short and rounded, then the gravel or sand is too sharp or too dirty. Since your catfish are newly bought, the problems might have been in the retailer's tank. That being the case, a clean tank plus suitable antibiotic should fix things if that's possible. I wouldn't randomly treat for flukes, worms or some other type of parasite because the symptoms sound so generic that an opportunistic bacterial infection strikes me as more likely. Cheers, Neale.>
Re: Undecided about how to treat further      10/21/18
Thanks Neale.
<You're welcome.>
I did lose the one Cory who was hanging out at the surface. Barbels and fins look good on remaining Corys.
<A good sign.>
The survivors are eating and acting normal.
<Likewise.>
I'm doing small water changes every few days.
<Wise.>
My substrate is sand and temp is around 76°F.
<Might lower the temperature a bit, certainly if these are Peppered Corydoras or one of the other cooler clime species. 22-24 C/72-75 F is probably optimal for most Corydoras, even if they tolerate water that's a little warmer. Certainly, adding extra oxygen can help, especially if your specimens are making frequent dashes to the surface for air -- a good sign the catfish are either heat-stressed or the bottom layer of water is oxygen poor.>
I think I have good surface agitation with AquaClear HOB and additional air stone.
<Good.>
You observation that it's stress related is the most likely cause of my losses. The LFS transfers them directly from shipping box to display tank and I found out that I had picked them up the same day that they came in. Poor fish!
<Ah, yes, this sounds like a bad situation.>
The remaining 4 (I lost three) are looking good and eating. I'll continue to keep their environment clean and stress free and keep my fingers crossed.
<Most Corydoras species are reasonably hardy, and some, like Peppered and Bronze Corydoras, a fair degree tougher than that. Good conditions, and perhaps suitable antibiotics, should help, given time enough for the fish to feed up and put on weight. Good luck! Neale.>

Press Release - Canadian Lake Okanagan Freshwater Mysis Shrimp Cubes      10/16/18
Attached – please include in next issue or post
Chris Clevers
President/COO
Hikari Sales USA, Inc.
Offering Hikari®, Bio-Pure®, Bio-Pure® FD, Aquarium Solutions®, Pond Solutions®, Reptile Solutions® & Takara Products
2804 McCone Avenue
Hayward, CA 94545-1663
www.hikariusa.com<http://www.hikariusa.com/>

Possible Betta Tumor?      10/16/18
Hi guys
<Hello,>
I’ve been reading your page for a while and have managed to so far keep my three beloved Bettas happy and content... a few months ago one of my boys however started developing a black growth as you can see in the photo that is definitely getting bigger...
I don’t know if this is a tumor or something treatable?
<Almost certainly not.>
He seems active and just as daft as always and the tank is testing normal, regular changes and weekly tests etc all as they should be...
Is there anything I can treat him with or is it just a matter of letting him carry on until his quality of life reduces and then letting him pass quickly?
<Precisely. Tumours and other sorts of growths, whether benign or malignant, are not uncommon in Bettas. There's no obvious explanation beyond inbreeding, and certainly no clear treatment. Often benign tumours cause no immediate problems, and if your Betta is otherwise happy, I would not be overly concerned just yet. Cheers, Neale.>

Re: Possible Betta Tumor?
Thank you for confirming what I thought - I really appreciate it!
<Welcome.>
Even when you think you know then knowing that you can’t do any more is reassuring and to be fair most vets look puzzled when I ask them so it’s really really appreciated. And thank you for all the fish guides! When I first got my boys they were immensely helpful as I hadn’t had Bettas for about 15 years and frankly I probably could have created better conditions for them last time compared to the mansions they have these days ��.
Have a lovely evening!
Tinx
<Wow! Thanks for these kinds words, and taking the time to write us. We do appreciate that. Hopefully your Betta will live a happy life, if not perhaps quite as long as it might have otherwise been. Cheers, Neale.>

GF ish, no data, reading...       10/16/18
Any ideas what is wrong with this fish? Dark spots and hanging out at the bottom.
<Mmm; appears to be septicemic... burnt... Water quality issue? What's your test kits readings telling you? What re set up, maintenance, foods, feeding? Have you read re on WWM? Do so. Bob Fenner>

Press Release - Vibra-Bites     10/13/18
Attached – please include in next issue or post
Chris Clevers
President/COO
Hikari Sales USA, Inc.
Offering Hikari®, Bio-Pure®, Bio-Pure® FD, Aquarium Solutions®, Pond Solutions®, Reptile Solutions® & Takara Products
www.hikariusa.com<http://www.hikariusa.com/>
www.facebook.com/hikariusa<http://www.facebook.com/hikariusa>
www.youtube.com/allfishlovehikari<http://www.youtube.com/allfishlovehikari>
www.google.com/+Hikariusa-aquatic-diets<http://www.google.com/+Hikariusa-aquatic-diets>
twitter.com/fishlovehikari<http://twitter.com/fishlovehikari>
PRESS RELEASE – For immediate publication
Hikari Vibra-Bites™

Hikari® is please to introduce its newest addition to its extremely popular line of tropical diets, Vibra-Bites™. Great for all types of tropical fish, this flavorful nutrient mix offers many unique benefits. From the pellet design, which mimics a blood worm moving through the water, to the incredible color enhancing ability which will help your fish glow with a flood of color, to the exacting nutrient balancing through extensive feeding trials that helps us offer growth and form you won’t believe, this is truly a new generation aquatic diet. The oxygen barrier package helps maintain the quality and perfection consumers have come to expect from the leader in aquatic nutrition worldwide. For more information contact us Hikari Sales USA, Inc. at fish@hikariusa.com or (800) 621-5619. You can also see more information on this item at www.hikariusa.com

ACF Tadpole Die-off     10/13/18
Over the last few months I decided to raise around 80 African Clawed Frog tadpoles and for the most part, things have gone fine. 3 days ago, I was down to my last 4 tadpoles, in the 10 gallon tank, within 2 days, 3 of the
last 4 had died off and my last tadpole looks like this (see attached image).
<I see.>
In the last day, the end of the tail went limp like the other 3 before they died but in this case, the tadpole's tail end has essentially just rotted off, it's the only occupant of the tank nothing could have bitten it. All of the water parameters are normal, no ammonia, nitrites, nitrates,
<I doubt nitrates are zero. So if your test kits are offering these numbers, you probably should distrust them. Zero ammonia and nitrite are certainly possible, indeed, preferred; but since nitrate is the end product of filtration, it should accumulate over time between water changes.>
the GH and KH are constant.
<Constant what? As a reminder, neutral, medium hardness water is the ideal.
Water temperature should be around room temperature, 18-20 degrees C being ideal for the classic Xenopus laevis species most widely traded. Avoid excessively high temperatures, and similarly, avoid chilling and/or exposure to cold air. Xenopus tropicalis is less commonly traded, and requires warmer water (24-28 C) and prefers softer water chemistry.>
About 2 weeks ago, when there were 7 left, I altered the water change schedule to 50% every 3 days since the parameters were staying constant.
<Do remember water changes need to be more or less daily, and ideally twice daily. Xenopus tadpoles, like baby fish, are very sensitive to 'old' water, especially in small tanks. The easiest approach is to reduce the number of
tadpoles per tank, which puts less pressure on water quality, and in turn makes it easier to rear them successfully. Trying to rear huge numbers can be an overwhelming task. Do be ruthless about removing uneaten food and
dirt (turkey basters are ideal for spot cleaning) while also ensuring more, small meals rather than 1-2 big meals.>
The only issue I've had was the heat going out in the house for 3-4 days but the lowest the house dropped to was about mid 60s (F).
<Might be a bit cold, especially if there were cold draughts of air as well.>
As of 2 days, after the first tadpole had died and the others were acting sluggish, I restarted daily 50% (looking back, I would've gone with 30% but I've been a bit burnt-out these last two weeks) changes on the 10 gallon. My
thinking was that perhaps the water wasn't being properly oxygenated on the every 2 days water change schedule but now with this tadpole's Finrot-like symptom, I'm just baffled - each of the others had the same tail tip droop
but none of them lasted long enough for it to progress to more than a droop. (Note: the final tadpole just died early this morning but I'd still like to figure out what on earth happened to prevent anything like this in the future should I decide to raise more tadpoles at a later date).
<While the tail-drooping is remarkable, it may be more a reflection of general failure to thrive rather than some specific disease or problem.>
Additionally, I've fed them Xenopus express tadpole food daily for the past 160-odd days since the tadpoles hatched. Over the last few days, after the heat went out, the last 4 tadpoles all became lethargic and stopped eating/actively swimming. Each of them were receiving about 0.3ml of the tadpole suspension a day in the week prior every afternoon, Xenopus Express' feeding instructions assume you're raising the tadpoles in bulk and don't translate well to smaller numbers. I had almost no issues while I was dealing with a large number of tadpoles but once I was under 20, I found myself a bit uncertain of a good feeding schedule/amount, I'd welcome any suggestions on how much to feed a single tadpole.
Thank you for any advice.
--A
<Hope this helps. Neale.>

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Freshwater Aquarium  Articles & FAQs

  • Set-Up: Gear/Components:, Set-Up, Tanks, Stands, Covers:, Water, Filtration of All Sorts, Sumps, Refugiums:, Circulation, Pumps, Powerheads, Aeration, Electricity, Heating/Chilling,  Light/Lighting:; Types of Systems:, Substrates, Aquascaping:
  • Livestock 1: Stocking/Selection, Biotopes, Quarantine, Acclimation. Fishes: Stingrays, Inadvanced Bony Fishes, Eels, Tetras & Their Relatives, Killifishes, Livebearers, Catfishes, Goldfish, Barbs, Danios, Rasboras, Minnow Sharks, Loaches, Misc. Fish Groups

    New Print and eBook on Amazon

    Goldfish Success
    What it takes to keep goldfish healthy long-term

    by Robert (Bob) Fenner


    Livestock 2: Gouramis, Bettas, Cichlids, Fresh to Brackish Water Fishes, Invertebrates (Hydra, Worms, Snails, Insects, Crustaceans...),

    New Print and eBook on Amazon

    Betta Success
    Doing what it takes to keep Bettas healthy long-term

    by Robert (Bob) Fenner


  • Herps: Amphibians, Turtles,
  • Maintenance/Operation: General Maintenance, Algae, Foods/Feeding/Nutrition, Disease/Health,
  • Freshwater Aquarium Science:  Behavior, Topics, Reference and Aquatics Writing Business, Reviews, 

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