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FAQs on Acclimation Chemicals

Related Articles: Acclimation, Quarantine ppt., pt.s 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 by Bob Fenner  Acclimation Articles by Bob Fenner, Acclimation in the Business by Bob Fenner, Acclimating Photosynthetic Reef Invertebrates to Captive LightingMethylene Blue,

Related FAQs:  Acclimation 1, Acclimation 2, Acclimation 3, Acclimating Marine Invertebrates, & FAQs on Acclimation: Rationale/Use, Tools/Gear, Methods, Controversies, Troubles/fixing, & Acclimating Invertebrates, Acclimation of Livestock in the Business, Dips/Baths 1, Best Quarantine FAQs, Quarantine

Some ref.s, some places, folks suggest different adjuncts... do read thoroughly re specific uses, cautionary remarks

Quarantine question; rdg.        6/8/17
Hello WetWebMedia Crew! First of all, allow me to say that I truly am a big fan of your forum as it is a source of much information ...... thank you also for quickly replying to my emails in the past.
<Welcome Kathy>
I have a quick question for you today, about quarantine procedures ...... I recently purchased some golden semilarvatus butterflies and a tigerpyge to be shipped from the USA to Manila. I have read that butterflies and Centropyge have a high sensitivity to copper and that the next best thing to get them started with the quarantine procedure is to do a freshwater dip with Methylene blue?
<Yes; one approach that is less toxic; effective>
1. What is the ratio of freshwater to Methylene blue?
<VERY safe; you just want the water VERY blue... Can't say the ratio, as individual products are of differing concentration. Put in enough that you can't see the bottom of the container>
2. And do I dip them as soon as the shipment arrives?
<No; need to flush out the ammonia in the fishes... and the water. READ here: http://www.wetwebmedia.com/acclimat.htm
and the linked files above; till you're sure you know what you're doing>
Or do I wait for a few days before doing the dip?
<For these species, I would do along with the acclimation protocol... i.e., on arrival>
I am just a bit worried that the fishes will be highly stressed out from the long flight time?
<I understand. IF they do appear too stressed, you can wait for the dip/bath procedure later... as you suggest.>
Would love to hear your thoughts on this. And thank you very much in advance.
Kathy ��
<DO write back if all is not clear. Bob Fenner>
Re: Quarantine question       6/8/17

Hi Bob! Thank you very much for the prompt reply.
<Certainly welcome>
Will read on the link you forwarded and will send you an email again if I do have further questions. Truly truly appreciate all your advice.
Kathy
<Cheers, BobF>

Methylene blue necessary for acclimation?       10/10/15
Hi your websites great, so much useful info.
<We try!>
I've been reading your guide to acclimatizing new imports, everything makes sense and i am ready to trial your recommended method. The problem I have is I'm based in the UK and I can't seem to purchase Methylene blue to add
to the freshwater dip, is it essential to add the Methylene blue?
<Not required, but helpful. Ph and temperature adjusted freshwater is fine.>
Is there any other treatment that is available in the UK that I could use in place of the Methylene blue.
<Personally I believe in watching the animal at a dealer's for a week or so, making sure it's healthy insofar as you can
observe, with a deposit to hold onto the fish if needed. My favorite local retailer dips them as he receives them and again before he sells them to me, may want to ask for this service, which they should be happy/wise to provide. Chemical dips are possibly stressful and I consider them more of a prophylactic for suspect animals than a requirement.>
Thanks Chris
<Glad to be of use, please follow up with your results for others' edification and also read WWM's section on dips, it's pretty thorough. -EC3>
Re: Methylene blue necessary for acclimation?       10/13/15

Thanks for coming back to me so quickly.
<Now BobF; Don't know if Earl put this in my inbox....>
Sorry I wasn't very clear in my firs message, I run an lfs and am wanting to fine sop for new fish imported.
<Uhh; please read here: http://wetwebmedia.com/methbluefaqs.htm
and here: http://wetwebmedia.com/dipsadditvs.htm
Would just a freshwater dip be sufficient ?
<Uhh; let's have you scroll here: http://wetwebmedia.com/mardisindex.htm
Or do I need to get a treatment to add into the dip, if so any idea what I might be able to use over here in the uk ?. Thanks
<Right. Bob Fenner>

Re: Filtration recommendations and Dechlorinator reaction with Copper       4/1/15
Hi again, I'm just reviewing your Commercial Acclimation procedure again.
For Invertebrates it's basically the same steps as the fish without the use of Methylene Blue, but should we also employ the use of a PVP dechlorinator with tap water as well, in order to flush out the old shipping water?
Thanks again.
<Mmm; however it is done, you want to make sure any chlorine or chloramine is removed. In actual practice this is rarely an issue; given the means most facilities employ initially treating source water (contactors mostly)... and most sanitizer IS complexed in the process of mixing with synthetic salt mix... We are still talking marines correct?
Bob Fenner>
Re: Filtration recommendations and Dechlorinator reaction with Copper       4/1/15

Hello Bob,
<Kevin>
Thank you for the information. Yes marine invertebrates, more specifically SPS and LPS corals.
<... Okay; a carbon contactor for removing the sanitizer; or for a smaller facility/volume, pre-mixing and storing new water. BobF>

Dip for new fish SW Dips\Baths 1/1/2010
Hi there.
<Hi John, Happy New Year>
Upon reading the procedure for acclimatising saltwater fish, am I correct in thinking Meth Blue can be used with saltwater for a dip?
<Most certainly!>
Salinity in my display is 1.022 (all other parameters are acceptable) and I would like to use this water, rather then fresh, to gradually acclimatise new fish in a separate container.
<That is fine.>
Once acclimatised (around 30mins?),
<Sure.>
I'll add Meth Blue, leave it for around 15mins and then net the fish out.
New fish include a Harlequin Tusk, followed by five Humbugs.
Thanks again for your previous prompt replies.
<No problems with what you propose.>
John
<MikeV>

Buffering and Quarantine: Water Chemistry Post-RO filtration and pH Acclimation 12/20/2009
Dear WWM Crew,
<Hi Angela.>
Thanks again for your generosity! We greatly appreciate your gifts of knowledge, experience and valuable time! You do a wonderful job of helping the novices and pros alike. Thank you so much!
<Thank you for the kind words.>
Just two brief clarifications today.
<Sure.>
First, I have begun pre-buffering my RO water with Seachem Reef Buffer after discovering that it was dreadfully acidic.
<Which is usually the case post RO.>
I have not noticed any significant changes so far but wanted to ask how much this will effect the ionic balance of my water. Would it be better to use the Seachem Reef Builder product instead, or perhaps nothing at all? Of course opinions vary on this subject. FYI, I have a lightly stocked 110 gallon reef system and I don't think that water parameters are needed in this email.
<It never ceases to amaze me that we (and I include myself in this statement) filter everything out of our water only to put most of it right back in again, but I digress. In any case, the method that works for me is this. I add simple baking soda to the water to get it either neutral or slightly caustic. After which, I add my salt mix; l after that has all dissolved, I test again and make any adjustments that may be necessary.>
Secondly, I have set up a 30 gallon cycled quarantine system in anticipation of some fish from Live Aquaria.com.
<Bravo on following QT procedures.>
From what I understand, pH shock is perhaps the most common cause of death with mail order specimens.
<Yes.><<Mmm, much more the change in charge of ammonia coupled with too high pH in new water. RMF>>
I was considering keeping the system at around 7.8 using the Aquarium Pharmaceuticals product "pH Down".
The reasoning being that the water will be quite acidic on arrival. Does this sound like a wise choice to you?
<That would work, but you are putting extra work upon yourself. Easier, would be to drip acclimate the new fish to the QT water pH and then introduce.>
What if the bag water is significantly lower or higher in terms of pH?
Is it advisable to adjust the quarantine water in accordance to testing the bag water before the fish go in?
<No, again, better the adjust the bag water (smaller volume, much easier to adjust) to the QT tank.>
Thanks so much!!
<My pleasure as always.>
Angela
<MikeV>

Colloidal Silver? On another board someone recommends over and over putting a few drops of colloidal silver into the bag new fish come in, while acclimating them, as a way of preventing/eliminating disease, etc.  Claims always has healthy fish, never introduces disease. Can anyone at WWM confirm this?  Has anyone done it?  Just curious. <There were some fish medications that used to contain silver salts... there is need to be within a narrow margin of concentration of actual silver ions... so, no to "putting a few drops" into a "bag". Some folks still use Methylene blue (mainly for freshwater) or furan compounds in their shipping water... these are safe, effective. Bob Fenner>

Treating new fish 6/18/03 Hello Anthony, <cheers, mate> I thought about Formalin, but was worried about its effects on the filter (which is biological)? <valid... but not so severe as many other meds (like copper, Methylene blue, erythromycin, etc)> I will consider a formalin dip, the Melafix was added because I had some and I thought it would be fine with the shark. <agreed... I do believe it is safe for the shark... and safe for the parasites too <G>> how lo would you say to lower the salinity by (if the shark was removed)? <1.018> I am completely struck on transshipped marines and I am due a list from Hawaii. Can you suggest any thing from there that is really good or worth having? <many fine wrasses, a few dwarf angels... beautiful triggers and Tobies (dwarf puffers)...> in my mind I am thinking flame angels, potters angel, Lemonpeel angels, yellow Sailfin tangs, chevron tangs - common but sought after! <the tangs yes... very much. Great fishes and hardy. The Potters... no way. They are so delicate that many don't even make it to the US mainland. Not a strong fish under any circumstance... lets leave those beauties in the sea. Lemonpeels and Flames can be quite hardy once established though. Very fine.> Regards, Sam <best regards, Anthony>

Medication for adding fish  9/13/05 Bob, can you take a look at this message regarding the "secret formula". Do you know of any such thing? Regards, Salty <I also know of no such "magic herbal remedy"... RMF> Medication for adding fish Hello: About 6 years ago I started in the hobby of keeping a fish only marine aquarium. Like most beginners, my luck with keeping the fish alive for an extended period of time (more than 1 year) was severely limited. I never had any luck with certain species, specifically the Blue (Hippo) Tang... and not quite sure why. I have a 125 gallon tank. With around 250lbs of live rock. Water quality was "theoretically" perfect, yet the Blue Tangs I would keep would perish within a few weeks or couple of months. Anyway, about 3 years ago, I visited a local fish store and I was discussing this problem with the owner of the store and he sold me a "medication" to add to the tank when the fish were showing signs of stress or when I was adding a new fish to the tank. This "medication" was contained in 2 small (5 ml.) dropper bottles, labeled "Part A" and "Part B" - and was sold in a small clear plastic box. I was informed that this product was only available to the trade to assist in reducing stress on the fish after transportation. I have no idea what this product was (it was explained as a herbal-based medication) The store owner said he wasn't supposed to sell this medication... although I'm not sure why - but it worked absolute wonders. Anyway - to cut a long story short, I purchased another Blue Tang and used this medication when adding the fish to my tank. The fish showed absolutely no signs of stress (which is very rare for Blue Tangs). A couple of drops (of each part) of this medicine on day one, and another drop of each 4 days later helped this Tang tremendously. Also, a couple of other fish that were rather lethargic, were revitalized - especially a Harlequin Tuskfish. The entire tank thrived for about 2 and a half years... until a "bad accident" that occurred when we had our house redecorated, wiped out the entire tank - which was, at the time, rather annoying and disappointing. I am in the process of re-establishing the tank, and have had it set up for 6 weeks without adding any fish yet. Do you have any idea what this "medication" was and where I can get it from - it really worked miracles. Also, I plan to do fish-only again and want to select colorful fish that are quite hardy... in this case what would you recommend. Any info you could provide is greatly appreciated. <Jeff, I know of no "secret" formula for stressed out fish. Will run this by Mr. Fenner for his input. As far as starting over, I suggest you search our WWM site, keywords, "startup" and "quarantine". If things are done properly, no special medication should ever be needed. As to fish, clowns, Dottybacks and wrasses are all quite colorful and hardy. James (Salty Dog)> Thanks, Jeff

Medication for adding fish  9/16/05 Would the product name "Reef Remedy" possibly be the product I'm looking for? <I've never heard of the product.> I think this might have been the name of the product, since I found a piece of paper in my cabinet that had this name written on it. Are you familiar with such a product? <No> I just remember it working wonders for the fish, especially when  acclimating. Finally, do you have any comments or opinions on the products Bio-Spira Marine (for saltwater) and Purigen (by Seachem) filter absorbent for organics and nitrogenous waste removal.  Both of these products have come highly recommended by my local FSH. <I prefer Chemi-Pure myself.  I've heard Purigen works well also, but never used Spira Marine and have heard nothing about the product.  James (Salty Dog)> Thanks, Jeff

Medication for adding fish  9/13/05 Bob, can you take a look at this message regarding the "secret formula". Do you know of any such thing? Regards, Salty <I also know of no such "magic herbal remedy"... RMF> Medication for adding fish Hello: About 6 years ago I started in the hobby of keeping a fish only marine aquarium. Like most beginners, my luck with keeping the fish alive for an extended period of time (more than 1 year) was severely limited. I never had any luck with certain species, specifically the Blue (Hippo) Tang... and not quite sure why. I have a 125 gallon tank. With around 250lbs of live rock. Water quality was "theoretically" perfect, yet the Blue Tangs I would keep would perish within a few weeks or couple of months. Anyway, about 3 years ago, I visited a local fish store and I was discussing this problem with the owner of the store and he sold me a "medication" to add to the tank when the fish were showing signs of stress or when I was adding a new fish to the tank. This "medication" was contained in 2 small (5 ml.) dropper bottles, labeled "Part A" and "Part B" - and was sold in a small clear plastic box. I was informed that this product was only available to the trade to assist in reducing stress on the fish after transportation. I have no idea what this product was (it was explained as a herbal-based medication) The store owner said he wasn't supposed to sell this medication... although I'm not sure why - but it worked absolute wonders. Anyway - to cut a long story short, I purchased another Blue Tang and used this medication when adding the fish to my tank. The fish showed absolutely no signs of stress (which is very rare for Blue Tangs). A couple of drops (of each part) of this medicine on day one, and another drop of each 4 days later helped this Tang tremendously. Also, a couple of other fish that were rather lethargic, were revitalized - especially a Harlequin Tuskfish. The entire tank thrived for about 2 and a half years... until a "bad accident" that occurred when we had our house redecorated, wiped out the entire tank - which was, at the time, rather annoying and disappointing. I am in the process of re-establishing the tank, and have had it set up for 6 weeks without adding any fish yet. Do you have any idea what this "medication" was and where I can get it from - it really worked miracles. Also, I plan to do fish-only again and want to select colorful fish that are quite hardy... in this case what would you recommend. Any info you could provide is greatly appreciated. <Jeff, I know of no "secret" formula for stressed out fish. Will run this by Mr. Fenner for his input. As far as starting over, I suggest you search our WWM site, keywords, "startup" and "quarantine". If things are done properly, no special medication should ever be needed. As to fish, clowns, Dottybacks and wrasses are all quite colorful and hardy. James (Salty Dog)> Thanks, Jeff

Medication for adding fish  9/16/05 Would the product name "Reef Remedy" possibly be the product I'm looking for? <I've never heard of the product.> I think this might have been the name of the product, since I found a piece of paper in my cabinet that had this name written on it. Are you familiar with such a product? <No> I just remember it working wonders for the fish, especially when  acclimating. Finally, do you have any comments or opinions on the products Bio-Spira Marine (for saltwater) and Purigen (by Seachem) filter absorbent for organics and nitrogenous waste removal.  Both of these products have come highly recommended by my local FSH. <I prefer Chemi-Pure myself.  I've heard Purigen works well also, but never used Spira Marine and have heard nothing about the product.  James (Salty Dog)> Thanks, Jeff  

Emperor Angel, Breathing and Vertical  - 5/11/06 Hi All, <Dave> I am a long time reader, first time writer who is (or more accurately, whose fish is) potentially quickly running out of options.   I purchased a changing Emperor Angel from saltwaterfish.com.  I have never before had any troubles with them other than this.  I followed my usual acclimation procedure.  I opened the bag and dripped for four hours to acclimate him to my QT system.  The acclimation container was dosed with Para Guard. This took place last night.   <... four hours? ParaGuard has a toxic component> Since I opened the bag and first looked at him, he has been breathing very heavily and bobbing in a vertical position, head down. <Did you match the pH of the drip water with that in the shipping bag?> The vendor assured me that the fish is merely in shock from the stress of shipping and that he would calm down. <Something to hope for> I don't believe that; I have seen this sort of thing happen before and an shocked fish usually comes around within 12 hours.  This fish has been in the tank now for over 24 hours and has shown no signs whatsoever of improvement. <No quarantine?>   He continues to breathe at give or take 170 gill movements/minute, and bob head down, <Very bad signs> usually at the top of the tank but will occasionally move down some. The current seems to toss him around and when it gets him completely upside down he rights himself only to resume his vertical position.  He is refusing food.  He is sharing the QT system with an Assasi Trigger (separated by eggcrate, of course) who is eating fine and seems to be in perfect health. <Oh! Good> I am worried that I am dealing with disease, possibly the early stages of Marine Velvet. <Mmm, not likely>   The fish has shown no physical signs other than what I described though; no spots, no off colors, no scratching.  I don't want to dip him if unnecessary as I don't want to stress the fish any further.  I have not seen any feces to know if internal bacterial may be to blame.   What action would you recommend, if any? Thanks in advance, Dave <Is a bit late, but to have matched the pH... Please see here: http://wetwebmedia.com/acclimat.htm Particularly the Guerilla piece below... This is highly likely the root cause of trouble here... shock, hemolysis from pH shift, endogenous ammonia... perhaps with a Malachite burn to boot: http://seachem.com/products/product_pages/ParaGuard.html ... I would try to stabilize this animal, leave the lights off... and add a pentose or hexose sugar as proscribed on WWM. Bob Fenner>

Re: Emperor Angel, Breathing and Vertical  - 5/11/06 Bob, <Dave> Thanks for your quick reply.  I might not have been completely clear in my message, but wanted to address your concerns to clarify if I had done something wrong.   <Let's do... am a bit blurry from travel/ing> Unfortunately, the fish died overnight.  I am working with the vendor. However, I think it prudent to do a "post-mortem" on my acclimation procedure to make sure I did what I should have done.   <Good idea> First, I acclimated over four hours, but only introduced Para Guard during the last hour of the acclimation.  I followed the directions on the bottle to the letter.   <Mmm, am still (as you will find... from long practice) not a fan of using Malachite... the principal ingredient, other than "aldehydes" in this fine SeaChem product... in dips for newly arrived marine fishes> Second, the drip water was from the quarantine tank which had in turn come from the main tank, which was already at 8.3.  You are correct in assuming that I did not test the PH of the bag water and match it to the tank water. <You will find as well that this is an incredibly important step in moving marines around in "long time" conditions... bringing livestock from one system quickly (let's say an hour or so) from/to another is a very different matter> I have never performed that step, but after perusing the acclimation guide (quickly) it looks like you are talking about a FW dip. <Mmm, no... this is a different concept/idea... protocol> That is not a step I performed.  I acclimated him to the QT tank's seawater.   Third, the fish exhibited this behavior even before I removed him from the bag.  Nothing changed about his behavior at any time, what I saw when I peered into the bag even before cutting it open is what I described, ergo he did not take on this behavior during the procedure, but rather he arrived this way.   <Yes... not unusual for marine angels, most marine fish groups to exhibit this sort of behavior... indicative of "shipping stress"... low pH, coupled with low dissolved oxygen, likely high CO2/carbonic acid concentration...> Fourth, when I say the fish has been in the tank for 24 hours I mean the quarantine tank, but I think you realized that further on in my message. <Yes> Given these clarifications, would you still say something was wrong with the way I did things, or was the fish doomed from the start?   Thanks again for your help so far!   Dave <Mmm, a matter of speculation/s and a few possible inputs, but if you had a hundred, a thousand such fishes to process, you'd find that using Methylene Blue, eschewing the use of Malachite Green, and especially adjusting/matching the shipping water pH to the acclimation/dip water would save a significant number of animals... this has become an "industry practice" of high regard... largely due to the efforts of Phil Shane/Quality Marine and the fine folks at TMC in the UK... to give credit where it's due. Bob Fenner>

Freshwater bath add-ons ... good ideas   5/26/06 Hello, <Jonathan> A strange thought occurred to me today.  I was remembering that marine fish 'drink water' to maintain their osmotic balance, thus you can use a vitamin supplement in their water and they will passively absorb some.  And fish often times initially come in underfed / malnourished. <This is so> Do you think it would worth it if a put some VitaChem or liquid gold in their freshwater bath? <Can help... though minimally due to the short duration of such dips/baths> Its usually only a bath for about 7 minutes duration, but in that time I can see their gills are really pumping and their probably taking in water faster than normal, being that their stressed / surprised. Also I'm thinking that besides the load parasites that meet their doom in the freshwater, a fish also sheds off some of its slime coat while in the freshwater bath. <Yes> Do you think wise to place the fish in a bucket of tank water with Novaqua or any other artificial slime coat product? <As a S.O.P. I have done this for decades in commercial settings, yes>   I ask to place in a separate bucket afterwards because I assume if I take a squirt of Novaqua while a begin the bath it will negate some of bath, the artificial slime coat benefiting the parasites as they hide beneath it. <Mmm, no... For the most part all get sloughed off...>   I suppose I could squirt in a little Novaqua toward then end of the bath.  What do you think? <Is what I do, endorse... Please read here: http://wetwebmedia.com/acclimat.htm> [p.s. Do you respond in email to questions or do I look them up on the site?] <Both. Cheers, Bob Fenner>

Guerilla Acclimation Techniques  7/5/08 Does this page exist anymore? <Mmm, yes... renamed: http://wetwebmedia.com/acclimat.htm > I have read the acclimation page, but in the FAQs people seem to reference another method (guerilla) and several chemicals not used in the acclimation technique on the current acclimation article page. Thanks Matthew Harless <Re-named Commercial instead of Guerilla... more PC? Bob Fenner>

Shipment coming tomorrow... acclimation question Hi Jason, (or Bob if you're back). Thanks for being there with all the great assistance! <You are welcome by both of us> Tomorrow I will receive my first shipment of mail-order livestock, (from FFExpress) and I think I'm ready. I have read and re-read your page on acclimation (www.wetwebmedia.com/acclimat.htm), and am all set up to follow the saltwater fish "guerilla" acclimation technique. I have just a couple small questions: #1 Using the kitty litter boxes, is it safe to acclimate several fish in the same container at the same time (as long as they are not the types to be aggressive towards each other)? <Yes, quite safe... In wholesale practice we often separate venomous fishes (e.g. Scorpionfishes, plotosid catfishes...) and larger, very aggressive fishes (e.g. triggers), but otherwise, most often mix together as bags are opened/processed> #2 Though it indicates that inverts, etc "merit a separate discussion", I couldn't find anything, so maybe you could give me counsel on the few non-fish I'm getting: a. 3 cleaner shrimp b. 3 peppermint shrimp c. 1 fire cleaner shrimp d. 1 green bubble anemone e. 1 Indonesian red Ricordea <I would place all of the shrimps together for acclimation, and the two cnidarians together... but do "drain" (I strain with hand movement) the anemone's shipping water in moving it to the acclimation tray> Thanks So Much! Jim Raub <Be chatting. Bob Fenner>

Re: Shipment coming tomorrow... acclimation question Hi Guys (and welcome back, Bob). <Hello and thank you> Sorry to be dense, here, but I just want to confirm that the same fresh water, pH-adjusted, PVP, Meth blue, Maracide, Maracyn acclimation solution I will use on the fish is A OK for the shrimp and cnidarians. <Mmm, not freshwater... I would use the same other components, but with seawater of about the same density as the shipping water the non-fishes are in> Also, confirming that unlike with the fish, where we keep their water and add in the acclimation solution, I should try to drain away as much of the shipping water as possible from the cnidarians, and basically just immerse them into the acclimation solution. (That hand-straining thing... should I worry about being stung?) <Yes to the technique and no problem with the calloused parts of your hands... do try to keep the stinging-celled animals off your wrist skin... and take care to wash your hands after handling... can be a real owee on your mucus membranes...> Really Sincere Thanks and Appreciation for all your help! Jim Raub <A pleasure my friend. Bob Fenner>

Questions on acclimating fish for retail sales.. Hi Bob, My name is Leland Foley and I am starting a Marine Fish/Reef Retail store.  <Outstanding... I will gladly shake the hand of anyone who would (try to) be self-employed. Welcome to our industry> I have worked in many other retail stores, including a couple of years for Inland Aquatics.  <Ahh, Morgan Lidster and I are known to each other> Anyway, I have been around long enough to learn a great deal about fish acclimation, and I really like the way you suggest to acclimate marine fish, but I have a few questions. <Please> 1.) How do you incorporate dips into your Guerilla Acclimation Techniques? I believe, as I'm sure you do as well, that the PVP based dechlorinator, in combination with the Methylene blue really helps the fish to survive the stresses of shipping, <Yes> but after this acclimation procedure, would it be too stressful to put them into a formalin dip before putting them into the main system tanks? <Good question... as it has the usual (lame) "it depends"... by and large if most all marine fish livestock is in "good enough" shape from this point in an/the acclimation protocol, it's "probably okay" (more beneficial than potentially detrimental) to proceed with another dipping/bath sequence...> I'm a strong believer in formalin dips and freshwater dips. They are primarily what I use when I receive a shipment of fish, because I'm sure as you know Clownfishes, and others will die of Brooklynella or crypto quite quickly if not treated immediately upon arrival. <Agreed, especially with Clowns> My acclimation procedure consists of floating the bags to equalize the temps, and then in small batches putting the fish into a saltwater and Formalin dip, or a straight freshwater dip with bicarbonate. I've found that a great deal of fish will die in a freshwater dip, but do just fine in a saltwater with formalin dip. <As always... intelligence and experience go into deciding/judging dip types, duration...> Then the fish are removed from the dip and placed into a quarantine system (500 gal.) that is run by oversized wet/dries, mild protein skimming, and very strong U.V. sterilization. The fish are given high quality fresh seafood (shrimp, squid, marine fish, etc..) treated with garlic and Metronidazole for the first week then flake foods and various frozen foods are introduced. <Wow, quite an expensive undertaking... but worth it> I only use the garlic as a flavor enhancer, it might help remove worms, but this is not the primary reason I use it. <I understand> If a fish pops up with a bacterial infection we dip it again and carefully keep it overfed. If ich pops up on 3 or more fish we add copper to the system. Which brings me to my last question, 2.) What form of copper chelated or non-chelated can be used with UV sterilizers on? Or better yet what brand do you recommend? <In a large operation, volume or livestock flow-wise, non-chelated like the Kordon or Aquarium Systems product... Wouldn't, don't use chelated varieties on sleeved or non-sleeved UVs> Sorry for the long post, but as you know this is what makes or breaks ones profits in this industry, <I do know this... agree. Please make it known if I may be of assistance. Bob Fenner> Thanks,
-Leland Foley



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