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Related FAQs: Euphylliids/Caryophylliids, Caryophylliid Corals 2, Caryophyllids 3, Caryophyllids 4, Caryophyllid ID, Caryophyllid Compatibility, Caryophyllid Systems, Caryophyllid Selection, Caryophyllid Behavior, Caryophyllid Feeding, Caryophyllid Disease, Caryophyllid Disease 2, Caryophyllid Disease 3, Caryophyllid Disease 4, Caryophyllid Propagation/Reproduction, Elegance Coral, Elegance Corals 2Elegance Coral Identification, Elegance Coral Selection, Elegance Coral Compatibility, Elegance Coral Selection, Elegance Coral Systems, Elegance Coral Feeding, Elegance Coral Disease/Pests, Elegance Coral Reproduction, Stony Coral Behavior,

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Frogspawn, Grape, Anchor, Bubble... and Elegance Corals, Family Euphylliidae (formerly of the Caryophylliidae), Pt. 2

To: Part 1

By Bob Fenner

Catalaphyllia in the wild

Euphyllia cristata Chevalier 1971, Grape Coral. Colonies of 1-2 inch diameter. Large, circular polyp tentacles with round to flattened knobbed ends. Below: two pix in aquariums and one in N. Sulawesi.
Verticals (Full/Cover Page Sizes Available
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Euphyllia divisa Veron & Pichon 1980, Frogspawn Coral. Characterized by tubular tentacles with branchings and knob-like ends. At right, green colony, a one meter one in Malaysia and three aquarium close-ups below.

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Euphyllia glabrescens (Chamisso & Eysenhardt 1821), Torch Coral. Branches 1-1 1/2 inches wide with about one inch gap between. Skeletons thin and delicate. Tubular tentacles with rounded tips. Aquarium specimens at right and below, the last with partially exposed skeleton showing phaceloid colony

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Euphyllia paraancora Veron 1990, Branching Hammer Coral. Polyps very similar to E. ancora, but arranged in circular patterns. Aquarium photo. 

Genus Eusmilia: See Family Meandrinidae (moved by Veron, 2000)

Genus Nemanzophyllia Hodgson & Ross 1981, Fox, Ridge, Jasmine Coral. One species. 

Nemanzophyllia turbida Hodgson & Ross 1981, very thin-walled skeletons of flabello-meandroid construct. Distinctive lined polyps that are joined and truncated by living and dead portions of colonies. Best kept in medium current in low light conditions. A wholesale specimen at right, and two below in aquariums.  A great aquarium species. 

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Genus Physogyra Quelch 1884, Pearl Coral. One species

Physogyra lichtensteini Milne Edwards & Haime 1851. Massive or large plate colonies that are made up of solid plates. Tentacles open at night. During day, grape-like vesicles evident, able to be retracted quickly, unlike Plerogyra. At right, aquarium specimen and partly open vesicles in the wild. Below, completely open vesicles, closed colony and massive one showing skeleton Bunaken/Indo. images.

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Genus Plerogyra Mile Edwards and Haime 1848, Bubble, Bladder, Grape Coral. Characterized by their colonies being covered by oblong bubble-like vesicles by day, tentacles by night 

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Plerogyra sinuosa (Dana 1846). Flabello-meandroid skeleton as shown, with grape-like variable vesicles that are slow to retract (but still can/do sting). Typically found in turbid water.  Aquarium and two wild images (Indonesia) below showing vesicles open, a large colony and close up of skeleton at night. Below, second row: Skeleton close-up a small and large colony in the Red Sea. 
 
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Plerogyra simplex Rehberg 1892. Similar vesicles as P. sinuosa but colonies with branched skeletons of phaceloid colonies. Specimens off of Bunaken, Sulawesi, Indonesia.

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Genus Phyllangia: Similar to Rhizangiids; but azooxanthellate. Most deep water, a few shallow.

Phyllangia sp.  Bali 2014

 

Conclusion:

    Amongst the most popular aquarium corals, Euphyllids have much to recommend their captive use. They're certainly beautiful, interesting behaviorally, and conditionally hardy. Most need space around them, clean water, low lighting and water movement, and occasional feeding... outside of picking out initially healthy specimens.  They're larger losses are mainly a matter of a lack of care in collection and handling beyond. Don't let this short introduction decide for you however whether members of this newly-made family are for you. Investigate further before buying.    

Bibliography/Further Reading:

Coral Search

Borneman, Eric H. 2001. Aquarium Corals; Selection, Husbandry and Natural History. Microcosm-TFH NJ, USA. 464 pp.

Fatherree, James W. 1999. Elegance Coral. TFH 8/99.

Fatherree, James. 1999. Common corals of the genus Euphyllia. TFH 9/99.

Fatherree, James. 1999. Bubble corals in the reef aquarium. TFH 11/99.

Fenner, Robert. 2000. Catalaphyllia. What's wrong with your Elegance Coral, family Catalaphylliidae. FAMA 3/00.

Fossa, Svein A. & Alf Jacob Nilsen. 1998 (1st ed.). The Modern Coral Reef Aquarium, v.2 (Cnidarians). Bergit Schmettkamp Verlag, Borhheim, Germany. 479pp.

Giovanetti, Thomas A. 1989. Keeping Plerogyra sinuosa, the Bubble Coral. FAMA 7/89.

Hoover, John. 1998. Hawai'i's Sea Creatures. A Guide to Hawai'i's Marine Invertebrates. Mutual Publishing, Honolulu HI. 366pp. 

Humann, Paul. 1993. Reef Coral Identification; Florida, Caribbean, Bahamas. New World Publications, Inc. Jacksonville, FL.  239pp.

Michael, Scott. 1996. Bubble Coral; the opinions about keeping them seem to be inconsistent. AFM 3/96.

Verloop Ria and Ron Ates. Elegance Coral Catalaphyllia jardinei. FAMA 12/99.

Veron, J.E.N. 1986. Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. U. of HI press, Honolulu. 644 pp. 

Veron, J.E.N. 2000. Corals of the World. Australian Institute of Marine Science. Queensland, Australia. three volumes. 

To: Pt. 1


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